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The evidence almost always wins May 27, 2017

Posted by OromianEconomist in 10 best Youtube videos, 25 killer Websites that make you cleverer, Uncategorized.
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Odaa OromooOromianEconomist

 

‘You can lose your faith. You can’t lose facts. In the end, the evidence almost always wins, as it did for Napoleon, as it will for Trump. And instead of tasting the sweet fruit of gradual accomplishment, they drank the bitter brew of abject failure. Many of them, in this moment, would find that ego that had whispered affirmations in their ears for so long, was now saying something quite different. It’s not a way to live. It’s not a way to do big things. It’s a way to fail big.’

 

Ryan Holiday InstagramYou have to believe in yourself, they say. “If you don’t, who will?” goes the seductive logic. When no one else believed in me, I believed in myself. And so a seemingly empowering but innocuous phrase has been inscribed on a million inspirational quote images, been the subject of countless self-help books and…

via I Don’t Have Faith In Myself, I Have Evidence — Thought Catalog

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What Is Social Intelligence? Why Does It Matter? May 5, 2017

Posted by OromianEconomist in 10 best Youtube videos, 25 killer Websites that make you cleverer.
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 Intelligence, or IQ, is largely what you are born with. Genetics play a large part. Social intelligence (SI), on the other hand, is mostly learned. SI develops from experience with people and learning from success and failures in social settings. It is more commonly referred to as “tact,” “common sense,” or “street smarts.”

What are the key elements of social intelligence?  Click here to read the full article by   Ronald E Riggio Ph.D. Cutting-Edge Leadership


Emotional intelligence starts with understanding your own emotions (self-awareness), then being able to manage them (self-regulation) and use them to achieve your goals (self-motivation).

Once you are able to understand and manage yourself, then you start to understand the emotions and feelings of others (empathy) and finally to influence them (social skills).

Read more at: https://www.skillsyouneed.com/ips/social-skills-emotional-intelligence.html

 

It’s no secret that good leaders are also good communicators.  And the best leaders have learned that effective communication is as much about authenticity as the words they speak and write.

Indeed, communication and leadership are inextricably tied. How can you galvanize, inspire or guide others if you don’t communicate in a clear, credible, authentic way?

Here are 5 essential communication practices of effective leaders.  Click here to read at  Forbes  the 5 Habits of Highly Effective Communicators: Mind the say-do gap. Make the complex simple. Find your own voice. Be visible. Listen with your eyes as well as your ears. 

How to Spot a Bad Leader: Click here to learn the tactics used by leaders from hell.

 

Great leaders are people with the skills, commitment, and character that we want to emulate. The very best lead by example and aren’t afraid to roll up their sleeves and work side-by-side with followers. They are Optimistic and Inspirational.   Great leaders build bridges, not walls.  They do the right things.  They don’t abuse or “damage” followers in the process.  They unite, not divide.  And, they leave the followers and the team/organization/country better off than when they began to lead.

This is the Difference Between a Hypothesis and a Theory April 20, 2017

Posted by OromianEconomist in Uncategorized.
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A hypothesis is an assumption, something proposed for the sake of argument so that it can be tested to see if it might be true.

In the scientific method, the hypothesis is constructed before any applicable research has been done, apart from a basic background review. You ask a question, read up on what has been studied before, and then form a hypothesis.

A theory, in contrast, is a principle that has been formed as an attempt to explain things that have already been substantiated by data. It is used in the names of a number of principles accepted in the scientific community, such as the Big Bang Theory. Because of the rigors of experimentation and control, its likelihood as truth is much higher than that of a hypothesis.

Click here to read the full article.

Data Science: 10+2 Data Science Methods that Every Data Scientist Should Know March 15, 2017

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12 Statistical and Machine Learning Methods that Every Data Scientist Should Know

 

  1. Statistical Hypothesis Testing (t-test, chi-squared test & ANOVA)
  2. Multiple Regression (Linear Models)
  3. General Linear Models (GLM: Logistic Regression, Poisson Regression)
  4. Random Forest
  5. Xgboost (eXtreme Gradient Boosted Trees)
  6. Deep Learning
  7. Bayesian Modeling with MCMC
  8. word2vec
  9. K-means Clustering
  10. Graph Theory & Network Analysis

Economics: Traditional & Behavioural: System Thinking 1 &2 April 12, 2016

Posted by OromianEconomist in 10 best Youtube videos, 25 killer Websites that make you cleverer, Economics.
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Odaa OromooTraditional  and  Behavioural Economics, System Thnking 1 and 2

 

Traditional economics views humans as robotic machines who make calculated decisions based on logic. In contrast, behavioural economics views humans as irrational and emotional beings who are influenced by biases and experience when making decisions. This infographic takes a closer look at just what behavioural economics is and how it can be used.

Read more at:- https://www.b2binternational.com/publications/what-is-behavioural-economics/

 

Related:-

10 key economic concepts

10 key economic concepts

4 Principles That Will Make You More Innovative July 23, 2015

Posted by OromianEconomist in 10 best Youtube videos, 25 killer Websites that make you cleverer.
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Four principles: Relax. Expose Yourself To New Ideas And New Perspectives. Get Ideas. Crashing Into Each Other. Work Hard.

Challenge yourself to use them today.

Related:

The 25 Most Productive Ways to Spend Time on the Internet & More.

https://oromianeconomist.wordpress.com/2014/08/23/the-25-most-productive-ways-to-spend-time-on-the-internet/

TIME

Combing through the research, what are the overarching principles that we need to know to be more innovative thinkers in everyday life? Here they are, with links to the research backing them up.

1) Relax

What is most likely your daily creative peak? Your morning shower. For many of us it’s the most relaxing part of our day — and the most creative.

Just beinghappy can make you more creative for days; seriously, just smile. Watching comedy clips helps, trying too hard hurts. If you tend to be hard on yourself, being less critical can make you more creative. Anger can boost originality in the short term — but it doesn’t last.

It’s probably no surprise that boring work is better done at the office and creative work is better accomplished at home. Hopeful employees are more original. Trust can even make…

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Statistics: The Sexiest Job of the Decade July 7, 2015

Posted by OromianEconomist in 10 best Youtube videos, 25 killer Websites that make you cleverer, Economics, Uncategorized.
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Discovering Python & R

Anyone who’s got a formal education in economics knows who Hal Varian is. He’s most popularly known for his book Intermediate Economics. He’s also the Chief Economist at Google. He is known to have famously stated more or less, that statisticians and data analysts would be the sexiest jobs of the next decade.

That has come true, to a great extent, and we’ll be seeing more.

Great places to learn more about data science and statistical learning:
1] Statistical Learning (Stanford)
2] The Analytics Edge (MIT)

In a paper called ‘Big Data: New Tricks for Econometrics‘, Varian goes on to say that:

In fact, my standard advice to graduate students these days is “go to the computer science department and take a class in machine learning.” There have been very fruitful collaborations between computer scientists and statisticians in the last decade or so, and I…

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What is Calculus Used For? TEDx Talks Faayidaan Eregaa maali? June 22, 2015

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learn calculus

This talk describes the motivation for developing mathematical models, including models that are developed to avoid ethically difficult experiments.  Three different examples from the field of human health are presented.

Jeffrey J. Heys is an assistant professor of chemical engineering at Montana State University. He received his B.S. in chemical engineering in 1996 from Montana State University, and his M.S. and Ph.D. from the University of Colorado at Boulder in 1998 and 2001,respectively.  His research area is computational transport and computational fluid dynamics in biological systems with an emphasis on fluid-structure interaction and multiphase flows.

BasicCalculus

Introduction to Calculus

http://ocw.mit.edu/resources/res-18-001-calculus-online-textbook-spring-2005/textbook/

How to Overcome Creativity Roadblocks May 6, 2015

Posted by OromianEconomist in 10 best Youtube videos, 25 killer Websites that make you cleverer, Africa, Ideas.
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There’s always going to be space for reading, curating and cheering on others’ work. But there should also be a space for building on it and creating stuff of one’s own. Each of us has something to say, and we have the responsibility and privilege of adding to the discourse. It’s up to us to find and nurture the right balance and feel inspired by—not intimidated by–the work that others do. After all, everything is a remix.

TIME

I have a lot of ideas in my head. And for the most part, that’s where they used to stay.

In my head. Where other people couldn’t see them, interact with them or build upon them. Where they were safe and untested and uncriticized. All mine.

Sure, I’ve created some. Some might say I’ve created plenty. But that’s only because they can’t see what I’m not creating. For example, this very post sat dormant for at least a month while I pondered, waited and nitpicked at it.

Because the riskiest, most dangerous and potentially most interesting ideas are the easiest to hold back. I would pin them down like butterflies on a mat, like art at a museum. They were in spreadsheets, in notebooks, on scrap paper around my desk.

And while it might feel creative to think of these ideas, they were dying a lonely death when I…

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