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Oromia: Athletic Nation Report: Oromian community rallies around one of their own June 19, 2017

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“Today is a win for everyone in our community,” says Aliya Balo, president of the Oromo Association of Manitoba.


TREVOR HAGAN / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS</p><p>Teresa Fekensa got support from the local Oromian community during the Manitoba Marathon. </p>
TREVOR HAGAN / WINNIPEG FREE PRESSTeresa Fekensa got support from the local Oromian community during the Manitoba Marathon.

Although Teresa Fekensa has never been to Winnipeg before this weekend, he felt right at home at the Manitoba Marathon.

The 35-year old, who immigrated to Toronto two years ago, won the men’s full marathon with an impressive time of 2:38:03.2. Despite travelling from out of town for the event, Fekensa may have had the biggest cheering section. Members of the Oromo Association of Manitoba came out to support him, as nearly 20 local Oromians proudly waved their flags as Fekensa crossed the finish line. Oromia is a region in Ethiopia, where Fekensa is originally from.

TREVOR HAGAN / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS</p><p>Manitoba Marathon winner Teresa Fekensa with the flag of Oromia. </p>
TREVOR HAGAN / WINNIPEG FREE PRESSManitoba Marathon winner Teresa Fekensa with the flag of Oromia.

None of them had any relation to Fekensa or really knew him before he made the trip for the marathon, but when they heard one of their own were coming in to compete, they wanted to show their support and make him feel comfortable.

“Today is a win for everyone in our community,” says Aliya Balo, president of the Oromo Association of Manitoba.

Fekensa immigrated to Toronto because he felt he wasn’t getting the right training, but more importantly, because he was protesting against the government. Thousands of protesters in the Oromia region have been killed, so for his safety and passion for running, he had to leave.

“I came to Canada to run,” says Fekensa, who trains at the Toronto Olympic Club. “Because of the situation in my country, I protested and didn’t want to stay there.”

Members of the Oromo Association of Manitoba say their people back home have no freedom and are under military control. To show their support for the protests, they cross their arms above their heads, which is exactly what Fekensa did when he crossed the finish line at the Manitoba Marathon.

“If people do that (in Oromia), the (government) will shoot you,” says Yoseph Gobena, an Oromo Association of Manitoba board member who immigrated to Winnipeg in 2006. “We’re not allowed to freely share our interests and express our freedom.”

Fekensa’s achievement shows that Oromian’s can not only participate in the Canadian community, but also succeed, Gobena says. He hopes Fekensa can open the door for more Oromian runners to come to Canada and is thankful to the Canadian government for giving his people freedom.

Fekensa, who was happy to have the support of local Oromians, says he plans to return to Winnipeg next year to defend his title. But that’s not his only goal for the future.

“My goal is to run for Canada and win for Canada, in any marathon,” he says.

Emily Ratzlaff, a local physiotherapist, was the first woman to cross the finish line in the women’s full marathon. It was her second time competing at the Manitoba Marathon and her first time running the full marathon.

“I’m surprised that I won,” says the 31-year old who finished the race in 3:14:38.8.

When she was four miles away from the finish line, she was told she was the leader and she couldn’t believe it, she says.

“I was excited, but I was also in pain so I just needed to keep running and finish,” says Ratzlaff who has competed in the Boston Marathon twice.

In the half marathon races, it was a pair of Bisons that stole the show.

University of Manitoba Bisons’ track athlete Daniel Heschuk, 20, finished first in the men’s half marathon and 26-year-old former Bisons’ track athlete Jaclyn Adamson was the winner in the women’s half marathon.

Adamson came into the Manitoba Marathon with some extra confidence from winning a marathon in Fargo last month.

“I thought Fargo was a fluke, so I was happy with how today went,” she says. “I went into it with no expectations and didn’t know any ladies running.”

Adamson was surprised she ran this quick at the Manitoba Marathon because of the weather conditions. It was hard to get traction with the roads being slippery and that her clothes quickly felt heavy from all the rain, she says.

It was a difficult race for Heschuk, who is originally from Neepawa. Heschuk was unable to make it to the medal ceremony as he needed medical attention after the race.

“Honestly there was a couple times during the race where I thought I couldn’t do this anymore,” he says.

Heschuk says what got him through those tough stretches was thinking of his uncle Mark Cameron, who died last year at the age of 40 from complications in a surgery. His uncle went through a lot, as he lived with a learning disability and survived a leukemia diagnosis at the age of five. He says his uncle was a huge fan of Terry Fox and participating in the Terry Fox run, so he wanted to dedicate this year’s race to him.

“If he can go through all this pain growing up, I can go through one hour of pain in this marathon,” Heschuk says.


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Maratoonii kalee Kanaadaa Manitoobaatti dorgoman Tarfaasa Fakkansaatti moo’atee badhaafame, VOA


 

 

 

 

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Oromia: Athletic Nation Report: Feyisa Lilesa fulfills his promise to protest fascist Ethiopia’s regime at the London Marathon 2017. Kenyan and Oromo athletes dominated both the London and Hamburg Marathon 2017 races. April 24, 2017

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Click here to read more on London Marathon 2017 Results: Men and Women’s Top Finishers

Click here to read more on Hamburg Marathon 2017 Results: Men’s and Women’s Top Finishers

Oromia: Athletic Nation Report: The global icon of #OromoProtests Olympian Feyisa Lilesa (Fayyisaa Leellisa) wins the New York City 2017 Half Marathon. Mare Dibaba Wins the Lisbon City. March 19, 2017

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Feyisa Lilesa wins the  2017 United Airlines New York City Half Marathon while American Molly Huddle defended her women’s title.   

Feyisa Lilesa makes Oromo protests symbol after winning New York City half marathon.

      Running Magazine: Feyisa Lilesa                  continues to protest home government,    this time at NYC Half

 Feyisa Lilesa, who is now living in the United States following his performance at the Rio Olympics, won the United Airlines NYC Half on Sunday. Again, the Olympic marathon silver medallist, who is Ethiopian, crossed his wrists above his head, forming an “X,” in solidarity with the Oromo people, the largest ethnic group in the Horn of Africa. It’s not the first, or second, time that Lilesa has performed such a gesture.

RELATED: FULL recap: United Airlines NYC Half (including Canadian results).

 

 Excluding Sunday’s performance, Lilesa has on two previous notable occasions performed what is part of the Oromo protests since the Olympics including at the Honolulu Marathon and the Houston Half-Marathon. The 27-year-old did not return to Ethiopia after the Olympics fearing for his life because of the finish line act. The long-distance specialist is currently residing in Flagstaff, Ariz. with his family recently relocating to the United States on Valentine’s Day.

According to CNN, there have been protests across Ethiopia “since April of 2014 against systematic marginalization and persecution of ethnic Oromos.” The protests can be sourced to the territorial limits of the capital city Addis Ababa extending into neighboring Oromo villages displacing residents. In 2016, Ethiopian security forces “killed hundreds and detained tens of thousands of protesters in Ethiopia’s Oromia and Amhara regions,” according to Human Rights Watch. The government told Lilesa that it would be safe to return home.

As seen a recent feature in the New York Times, Lilesa has received a green card as a permanent resident in the United States “for individuals of extraordinary ability in the sciences, arts, education, business and sports.” Lilesa’s finish line protests have led other runners, including several in Canada, to cross their wrists above their head at the finish line of races.

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On Sunday, Lilesa and Scotland’s Callum Hawkins were side-by-side entering the finishing stretch towards Wall Street. Lilesa won by four seconds in 1:00:04, his first victory since the 2016 Tokyo Marathon. In the women’s race, there was also a tight finish as American Molly Huddle completed the NYC Half three-peat bettering Emily Sisson in 1:08:19 to 1:08:21. The two are training partners and reside in Providence, R.I. (Huddle is married to former Canadian middle-distance specialist Kurt Benninger.)

““I never would have thought I could come back here and win three times,” Huddle said in a New York Road Runners (NYRR) release. “I remember the first win was such a surprise for me, and last year we ran so fast. I just feel really lucky to have won a third time. Every time is really difficult with an international field. New York Road Runners brings in some of the best of the best. Some people are in marathon buildups but some people were really gearing up for this race. I feel like it was a really cool win, and just contributes to my enthusiasm for New York.”

Rachel Cliff (1:12:07) for eighth and Eric Gillis (1:03:49) in 16th were the top Canadians in the race that featured more than 20,000 runners.


 

Ethiopian runner who protested in Rio reunites with family. #OromoProtests #OromoRevolution February 15, 2017

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`Odaa OromooOromianEconomist

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Ethiopian runner who protested in Rio reunites with family

NY Daily News, February 14, 2017

 

Olympic silver medalist Feyisa Lilesa, rear, of Ethiopia, hugs his wife Iftu Mulia, his daughter Soko, right, 5, and son Sora, left, 3, while picking up his family at Miami International Airport on Tuesday.

Olympic silver medalist Feyisa Lilesa, rear, of Ethiopia, hugs his wife Iftu Mulia, his daughter Soko, right, 5, and son Sora, left, 3, while picking up his family at Miami International Airport on Tuesday.

(WILFREDO LEE/AP)

The Ethiopian marathoner hid behind a column at the Miami airport as he carried a bouquet of red roses.Feyisa Lilesa’s daughter spotted him first and ran in for a hug. Then, his young son and lastly his wife.On Valentine’s Day, the Olympic silver medalist who became an international figure when he crossed his wrists in protest at the finish line in Rio de Janeiro finally reunited with his family. He was a little late (traffic), but what’s a few extra minutes when he’s already waited six long months to see them.As he made his way out of the airport, his daughter rode on the luggage and his son perched on his shoulders, carrying the flowers he brought as a gift.Ethiopia’s Lilesa afraid to return home after Olympic display“The biggest gift is us seeing each other again — and me seeing them again,” Lilesa said through a translator in a phone interview Tuesday. “It’s all been very tough.”

The 27-year-old eventually settled in Flagstaff, Arizona, after making an anti-government gesture during the Olympic marathon that drew global attention to the deadly protests in his home region of Oromia. He never returned home after Brazil out of fear of what might happen to him. He’s constantly been worrying about the family he left behind in Ethiopia. His nearly 6-year-old daughter, Soko, and 3 ½-year-old son, Sora, always asked when they will see him again.

Finally, he was able to answer.

Lilesa remains in the U.S. on a special skills visa. His family arrived on visas as well, secured through his attorney.

UC Davis researcher killed by protesters in Ethiopia

The plan now is this: A few days of beach time and then it’s off to Flagstaff where the family will settle into everyday life in their rental house.

One weight off his mind.

Still, he can’t forget what his country is going through, with the Oromia region experiencing anti-government protests over recent months. Violent anti-government protests spread to other parts of Ethiopia and led to a state of emergency that was declared in October.

Since his gesture, many have described Lilesa as a national hero.

Planned Parenthood fans, pro-life protesters rally across U.S.

“My mind is pretty much occupied by what is happening back home,” Lilesa said. “Whether I’m running or I’m sleeping or I’m laying back, my family and what is happening in Ethiopia — and what is happening to my people — that’s constantly on my mind.”

Olympic silver medalist Feyisa Lilesa, of Ethiopia, carries his son Sora, 3, and pulls along his daughter Soko, 5, after picking up his family at Miami International Airport on Tuesday.

Olympic silver medalist Feyisa Lilesa, of Ethiopia, carries his son Sora, 3, and pulls along his daughter Soko, 5, after picking up his family at Miami International Airport on Tuesday.

(WILFREDO LEE/AP)

Most days since his arrival in America have been spent training. It was his best cure for loneliness.

“I come from a very big family, and I’ve never lived alone,” Lilesa said. “I’ve always been surrounded by people I know. This has been the complete opposite. Here, I’m removed from all of that.”

Still, he would protest all over again.

Dozens gather to mark two-year anniversary of weekly BLM protests

“I think me taking the risk and putting family in that position and putting them potentially in harm’s way, it was a good lesson for a lot of people that you need to sacrifice in order for you to win some concessions and change your situation,” Lilesa said. “In that sense, it inspires people to fight for their rights and resist the government in Ethiopia. It also led to greater awareness about the situation in Ethiopia.

“Now, you see more coverage of the human rights violations. I speak with people wherever I go. Even outside the media limelight, people are interested in knowing. They heard the story because of my protest.”

Someday, he would like to go back to Ethiopia.

“But as long as this current government is in power, I don’t have hope of going back to Ethiopia,” he explained. “I do know change is inevitable.”

Paris Jackson supports DAPL protesters at Grammys

He also wants to compete at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. Whether that’s wearing the colors of Ethiopia, he doesn’t know.

“I’m not too hopeful the system will be changed in the next three years and I will be in a position to run for Ethiopia. We will have to wait and see,” said Lilesa, who plans to run in the London Marathon in two months.

For now, Lilesa’s priority is getting his family settled.

“I knew that we would meet somehow, but I didn’t expect it would happen under these circumstances over here,” Lilesa said. “When I think about my family, it takes me back to why I did this and why I’m here. I missed my family, but this was a big bother to me — the plight of my people.”


Related:

SB Nation: Olympian Feyisa Lilesa is reuniting with his Ethiopian family in U.S., despite fear of President Trump

 

Star Tribune: Ethiopian runner who protested in Rio reunites with family

WP: Ethiopian marathoner who protested at Rio Olympics reunites with his family

AP: Ethiopian runner who protested in Rio reunites with family

 

BBC: World-famous Ethiopian runner Feyisa Lilesa has reunited with his family for the first time since going into exile in the US after protesting against the government at last year’s Olympic Games in Rio, the New York Daily News reports.   

runner who protested in reunites with family in US. http://www.nydailynews.com/sports/more-sports/ethiopian-runner-protested-rio-reunites-family-article-1.2972659 

Photo published for Ethiopian runner who protested in Rio reunites with family

Ethiopian runner who protested in Rio reunites with family

The Olympic silver medalist who became an international figure by crossing his wrists in protest finally reunited with his family.

Report

His wife, daughter and son flew into Miami, where the 27-year-old athlete met them after a separation of about six months.

Feyisa told the newspaper through a translator:

The biggest gift is us seeing each other again, and me seeing them again. It’s all been very tough.”

Back in August, Feyisa became the first Ethiopian to finish in the top two of a men’s Olympics marathon since 2000, claiming silver behind Kenya’s Eliud Kipchoge.

As he crossed the line, he lifted his arms in an X-shape above his head in solidarity with the Oromo people, the country’s largest ethnic group, who have suffered a crackdown at the hands of the Ethiopian government.

The country’s officials said the runner would be welcomed home from Rio as a hero, but Feyisa said he might be killed if he returned.

Oromo Olympic marathon athlete Fayyisaa Lalisaa on the Guardian. #OrompProtests global icon p1Fayyisaa lalisaa Oromo national hero, at Rio 2016 Olympicmarathon in the podium, finishing line in #OromoProtests as winning theOlympic medal, 21 August 2016

 

The “x” sign is used as a symbol of protest in Ethiopia

https://www.facebook.com/VOAOromo/videos/1266626250039354/

Oromia: Athletic Nation Report: Oromo athlete Genzebe Dibaba Breaks world record in 2000m in Sabadell, Spain February 9, 2017

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Odaa OromooOromianEconomist

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As well as the outdoor 1500m world record, Dibaba now owns the fastest ever recorded times indoors for the 1500m, mile, 2000m, 3000m, two miles and 5000m.

World 1500m champion Oromo athlete  Genzebe Dibaba added to her growing list of record-breaking achievements by breaking the world 2000m record* at the Miting Internacional de Catalunya in the Spanish city of Sabadell on Tuesday, 7 February 2017.

The three-time world indoor champion overtook the pacemaker just before the half-way mark, which was reached in 2:42.65, and continued to extend her lead over her younger sister Anna and Morocco’s Siham Hilali.

She went on to stop the clock at 5:23.75, taking almost seven seconds off the world indoor best set by Gabriela Szabo in 1998. Although the 2000m isn’t an official world record event indoors, Dibaba’s performance – pending ratification – can be classed as an outright world record as it is faster than Sonia O’Sullivan’s outdoor mark of 5:25.36.

As well as the outdoor 1500m world record, Dibaba now owns the fastest ever recorded times indoors for the 1500m, mile, 2000m, 3000m, two miles and 5000m.

Elsewhere in Sabadell, European champion Adam Kszczot won the 800m in 1:46.31 with Spanish record-holder Kevin Lopez taking second place in 1:46.58.

European 5000m silver medallist Adel Mechaal was a convincing winner of the 3000m, clocking 7:48.39 to finish more than two seconds ahead of Italy’s Marouan Razine.

Oromia: Athletic Nations Report: Shining victories for Oromo athletes in 2017 Dubai Marathon in both men and women races. January 23, 2017

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Tamirat Tola was the only survivor of a grueling early pace tonight in Dubai. Six competitors and two pacemakers went through halfway under 62 minutes, and Tola was the only one to finish under 2:06. He crossed the line in 2:04:10, making him the third fastest Ethiopian ever and the ninth fastest man ever on a record-legal course. (The 2011 Boston Marathon, forever a scourge on the record books, means that Tola is the No. 11 performer ever in all conditions.)Tola’s run also broke the 2:04:23 course record, which was run in 2012 in much more hospitable conditions. It was in the 50s that year; it’s 72 in Dubai right now, at least 20 degrees warmer than ideal.

COMPLETE RESULTS

The weather, pace, and maybe a bizarre injury at the start knocked out Tola’s countryman Kenenisa Bekele just over halfway through the race. After the race, Bekele’s manager Jos Hermens told the broadcast said that Bekele was pushed from behind, fell, and injured his arm and calf right at the start of the race. Hermens said that on the broadcast that the gun went off at the start with no notice, which caused the crash.

But it was a breakout performance for the 25-year-old Tola, if it’s possible to break out after winning an Olympic medal. Tola hadn’t run a marathon since finishing fourth in Dubai in 2:06 in 2014. His focus on the track worked in 2016, as he ran 26:57 at the Prefontaine Classic and finished third in the 10K at the Olympics. His win is worth $200,000, and he missed a $50,000 bonus for breaking 2:04 by just ten seconds. Runner-up Mule Wasihun ran 2:06:46, and no one else broke 2:08.

Tola hung in the lead pack for the first half of the race, and between 25K and 30K, he and the rabbit broke away from the field. Rabbit Amos Kipruto dropped out just after 30K, and Tola was left with a one-minute lead that only grew.

With the hot conditions and hotter early pace, only six men broke 2:10.

In the women’s race, Worknesh Degefa beat pre-race favorite Shure Demise, finishing in 2:22:35. Demise was 22 seconds behind in second place. It was Degefa’s marathon debut. Like Tola, the 26-year-old won $200,000 for her efforts. Degefa’s debut is the eleventh fastest marathon debut ever.


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Oromia: Athletic Nation Report: Oromo athlete Almaz Ayana and Jamaica’s Usain Bolt have been crowned the female and male World Athletes of the Year at the IAAF Athletics Awards 2016 December 4, 2016

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Odaa OromoooromianeconomistOromo athlete Almaz Ayana is Olympic Champion with new world record. Tirunesh Dibaba is 3rd at #Rio2016jamaicas-usain-bolt-and-oromo-athlele-almaz-ayana-have-been-crowned-the-male-and-female-world-athletes-of-the-year-2016-at-the-iaaf-athletics-awards-2016

Oromia’s Almaz Ayana and Jamaica’s Usain Bolt  have been crowned the female and male World Athletes of the Year at the IAAF Athletics Awards 2016, held at Sporting Monte Carlo on 2nd December 2016.


Ayana had a record-breaking year. After recording the fastest 10,000m debut in history in June, the Oromian went on to win the Olympic title at the distance in a world record of 29:17.45.

She added to her Olympic medal haul in Rio by taking bronze in the 5000m, her only loss of the year. Having recorded three of the eight fastest times at 5000m, she ended the year as the Diamond Race winner for that discipline.

She becomes the third Oromo (representing Ethiopia) woman to win this award, following Genzebe Dibaba in 2015 and Meseret Defar in 2007.

“I don’t have words to explain my feelings right now, I’m so excited,” said Ayana whose award was presented by International Athletics Foundation (IAF) Honorary President HSH Prince Albert II of Monaco. “Really, I’m so pleased.”


Bolt, who won the award five times between 2008 and 2013, added to his legacy by earning the trophy for a record sixth occasion. The sprinting superstar this year successfully defended his Olympic titles in the 100m, 200m and 4x100m, bringing his lifetime tally of Olympic gold medals to nine.

He clocked season’s bests of 9.81 and 19.78 to win the 100m and 200m in Rio and then anchored the Jamaican team to a world-leading 37.27 when winning the 4x100m.

He also went undefeated throughout the whole season at all distances, including heats.

“I live for the moments when I walk into a stadium and I hear a loud roar and Rio was outstanding,” said Bolt, whose award was presented by IAAF President Sebastian Coe. “One of the main reasons I’m continuing for another year is because of the fans; they don’t want me to retire. I have to give thanks to them.”


Other awards

MALE RISING STAR
Andre De Grasse

At the age of 21, the Canadian sprinter earned the Olympic 200m silver medal in Rio, having set a national record of 19.80 in the semifinal. He took bronze over 100m in a PB of 9.91 and anchored the Canadian team to bronze in the 4x100m, setting a national record of 37.64.
FEMALE RISING STAR
Nafissatou Thiam

The Belgian all-round talent won gold in the heptathlon at the Rio 2016 Olympic Games with a world-leading national record of 6810. Just 21 at the time, only one athlete (Carolina Kluft) has ever produced a higher score than Thiam’s at that age. En route to her Olympic triumph, she set a world heptathlon best of 1.98m in the high jump; higher than the winning leap in the individual high jump final.
COACHING ACHIEVEMENT
Harry Marra

The US coach guided Ashton Eaton to his second successive decathlon gold medal at the Rio 2016 Olympic Games, where Eaton equalled the Olympic record, and his third consecutive world indoor heptathlon title. Marra also guided Brianne Theisen-Eaton to the pentathlon title at the IAAF World Indoor Championships Portland 2016, where she broke the North American record. She later earned the bronze medal in the heptathlon at the Rio 2016 Olympic Games.
PRESIDENTS AWARD
Tegla Loroupe

Loroupe was the Chef de Mission for the Refugee Olympic Team in Rio. The former marathon world record-holder helped select the Refugee Olympic Team after the Tegla Loroupe Peace Foundation held a competition at the Kakuma refugee camp in north-west Kenya.

This award recognises and honours great service to athletics.
WOMEN IN ATHLETICS
Polyxeni Argeitaki

Argeitaki is an assistant professor of athletics at the National Kapodistrian University of Athens. The former Greek champion at middle-distance events is the treasurer, council member and president of the scientific committee at the Hellenic Athletics Federation. She has also written more than 50 scientific publications.

This award recognises outstanding achievements and contributions made to develop, encourage and strengthen the participation of women and girls at all levels of the sport.


 

Athletic Nation Report: In Solidarity with the Oromo Protests athlete Hirut Guangul makes powerful gesture in 4-peat. #OromoProtests September 26, 2016

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Odaa OromooOromianEconomist

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Athlete Hirut Guangul joined the brave movement as she won the women’s marathon with a time of 2:44.25.

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Ethiopian Guangul makes powerful gesture in 4-peat


By Drake Lansman, 25 September 2016

MOLINE — As Hirut Guangul, of Ethiopia, crossed the Quad Cities Marathon finish line as the first woman overall for the fourth consecutive year, she crossed her arms above her head in an “X”.

Guanhul became the first QCM four-time champion, but the moment became larger than just her athletic achievement on Sunday morning.

“I like this race,” said Guanhul. “Four-time champion. I’m very, very happy.”

After the race, the 24-year-old said the “X” is a way of protesting the human rights abuses that are taking place in Ethiopia. Guanhul’s simple action is a brave and powerful one that bypasses any language barrier.

Hundreds of peaceful Ethiopian protesters have been killed or arrested by the Ethiopian military this year. Protesters have demanded equality for the country’s Oromo people, Ethiopia’s largest ethnic group that has felt marginalized by the government as it pushes them off their land before selling it.

Ethiopian runner Feyisa Lilesa held up an “X” with his arms as he won silver in the marathon at the Rio Olympics. The gesture has been used as a symbol of strength and peaceful resistance.

Lilesa says he likely will not be able to return home after making the gesture of solidarity. The Oromos also have used the “X” as a sign of their protest.

“The Ethiopian government is killing my people, so I stand with all protests anywhere, as Oromo is my tribe,” Lilesa said at an Olympic press conference. “My relatives are in prison, and if they talk about democratic rights they are killed.”

Guangul joined the brave movement as she won the women’s marathon with a time of 2:44.25.

She won her first QC Marathon in 2012, when she set the women’s open course record of 2:35.07. Guangul’s 2016 win earned her $3,000 in prize money.

Guangul says she enjoys the Quad Cities Marathon, and is happy to be back at the race.


 

Oromia: Athletic Nation World Report: Athlete Hajin Tola: Winner of Mississauga CanKen 5K race protests in support of Ethiopia’s Oromo people September 20, 2016

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Winner of Mississauga CanKen 5K race protests in support of Ethiopia’s Oromo people.
Ethiopia’s Hajin Tola won the inaugural CanKen 5K road race in Mississauga, Ont. on Sunday and performed a political protest by crossing his wrists to form an “X.” (Photo: Happy Films Photography.)


 

The inaugural CanKen 5K road race was held on Sunday in Mississauga, Ontario, Canada in an effort to strengthen Kenya-Canada relations through sport, business and community. The 5K was dominated by the Toronto Olympic Club as the event attracted some of southern Ontario’s top talent featuring Kenyan and Ethiopian teams.
At the front of the pack, Ethiopian Hajin Tola won in 14:45 and performed a political gesture crossing his wrists above his head in an “X,” done in solidarity with the Oromo people in his home country. The protest is the fourth such notable act by an Ethiopian at a race in the past month.

How the protests got started
Olympic silver medallist Feyisa Lilesa was the first to make headlines in August when he performed the protest in Rio in the men’s marathon. He feared for his life following the race as the protest was directed at the Ethiopian government.

RELATED: Quebec City Marathon winner Ebisa Ejigu replicates Olympic medallist’s political protest.

The protests are being done in response to the government’s displacing of Oromo people outside of Addis Ababa as the municipal boundary of the capital city is extended into neighbouring areas.

Why the “x” gesture?
The anti-government protest is meant to signify being handcuffed at the wrists. The Oromo people, with much of the population living in an area named Oromia, are the largest ethnic group in the Horn of Africa. As many as 500 people have been killed in the protests between November 2015 and June as reported by Human Rights Watch.

RELATED: Paralympic T13 1,500m silver medallist protests Ethiopian government.

Lilesa, the Olympic marathon silver medallist, performed the protest in Rio and said after the race that “If I go back to Ethiopia, I will be killed.” He has since arrived in the United States on a special skills visa and has not returned to East Africa though his family remains in Ethiopia. A GoFundMe page in his name has raised more than US$160,000 for travel and living costs.

RELATED: Ethiopian Feyisa Lilesa lands in the U.S. after staging political protest in Rio.

Also in Sunday’s race was Ebisa Ejigu who won the Quebec City Marathon at the end of August and also protested against the Ethiopian government. Ejigu finished fourth on Sunday in 15:04.

At the Mississauga race, the first three positions were awarded cash prizes of $1,500, $750 and $500 in both the men’s and women’s categories. Jane Murage was the women’s race winner in 17:16. There were a number of notable figures on hand for the inaugural event including Deputy Kenya High Commissioner to Canada Ambassador Jane Onsongo.

The 1K kids dash encouraged the next generation of runners to participate with a medal being awarded to all participants and trophies going to the top three finishers.

The Toronto Olympic Club won the team trophy for fastest average time and Team Umoja won the largest turnout trophy. Team Umoja is mainly drawn from Kenyans living in Canada. Full results can be found here.

VOA: Congressman Smith and Athlete Feyissa Lelisa at Capitol Hill. #OromoProtests September 13, 2016

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Oromo Olympic marathon athlete Fayyisaa Lalisaa in the social and international media. #OrompProtests global icon. p7

 

Press Conference to announce the introduction of a House Resolution “Supporting respect for human rights and encouraging inclusive governance in Ethiopia.” Oromo Olympic marathon runner who won silver in Rio, Feyisa Lelisa was invited to this event to make a remark and meet with U.S. Representatives.

 

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Oromo Ethiopian diaspora community optimistic about human rights bill

Several dozen members of the Oromo Ethiopian diaspora community expressed support for recently introduced legislation aimed at curbing human rights abuses in that country during a press conference outside the U.S. Capitol on Tuesday. Click here to read more.


CNS News: Rep. Smith on Ethiopia Rights Abuses: ‘Abomination When You Torture Your Own Citizens,’ click  here to read more.


Related, Media reporting Fayyisaa Leellisaa:-

Afk Insider: 12 Things You Didn’t Know About Ethiopian Marathon Runner Feyisa Lilesa, click here to read. 

 

Washington Post: Olympian Feyisa Lilesa: From Rio to America, I will keep fighting Ethiopia’s oppression, click here to read.

CNN: Olympic runner Feyisa Lilesa: ‘I will be killed if I go back to Ethiopia’, click here to read.

Al Jazeera: Feyisa Lilesa, who won silver for Ethiopia at Olympic Games in Rio, wants “superiority of one ethnic group to end”, click here to read.

Fox Sports: Ethiopian marathoner remains in US on visa after protest


QUARTZ Africa: SYMBOL OF RESISTANCE:Defiant marathoner Feyisa Lilesa has taken Ethiopia’s protests to the United States


The Guardian: Feyisa Lilesa: being an athlete allowed me to be the voice of my people


Mail Online: Olympic runner yearns for peace, fears bloodletting in Ethiopia


Foreign Policy

Tesfa News


 


Oromia: Athletic Nation World Report: The Rio 2016 Paralympic: Athlete Tamiru Demisse showed solidarity with #OromoProtests against the tyrannic Ethiopia’s regime as he claimed a silver medal, following a protest gesture made by Olympic counterpart Fayyisaa Leellisaa (Feyisa Lilesa). Gootichi Oromoo Atleet Taammiruu Demisee Paralympic Riyoo tti tibba injifate mallattoo mormii Oromoo agarsiise. September 13, 2016

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Odaa OromooOromianEconomist

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Oromo athlete Tamiru Demisse has registered double victory in the Rio 2016 Paralympic as he stands with #OromoProtests on world stage.

Injifannoo dacha dachaa: Gootich Oromoo, Atleet Taammiruu Demisee Paralympic Riyoo irratti injifannoo irratti injifannoo galmeesse. Akkuma Fayyisaa Leellisaa FXG Oromoo Adunyaatti ibse.

 

Oromo Paralympian makes protest gesture on finish line – video

oromo-athlete-tamiru-demisse-in-solidarity-with-oromoprotests-reacts-after-the-final-of-mens-1500m-of-the-rio-2016-paralympic-he-is-the-silver-medal-winneroromo-athlete-tamiru-demisse-in-solidarity-with-oromoprotests-reacts-after-the-final-of-mens-1500m-of-the-rio-2016-paralympic-he-is-the-silver-medallist

 

Oromo athlete Tamiru Demisse (Center) shows solidarity in the world stage with #OromoProtests after the final of men’s 1500m of the Rio 2016 Paralympic.He is the silver medal winner at the event. Tamiru Demisse is 22 years old ( Born October 7, 1993).

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Silver medalist Tamiru Demisse also refused to sing #Ethiopia national anthem in protest against the oppressive regime

silver-medalist-tamiru-demisse-also-refused-to-sing-ethiopia-national-anthem-in-protest-agnst-the-oppressive-regime-oromoprotests-11-september-2016-at-rio


Oromo Oromo athletes Tamiru Demisse (C), Megersa Tasisa (L) and sport journalist Adugna Angasu (R) who are in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil for the Paralympic 2016 show solidarity in a world stage to #OromoProtests, 11 September 2016.

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Atleetiin Oromoo Damiseee Taammiruu ‘RioParalympic’ (Oloompikii qaama miidhamtootaa) irratti Fiigicha meetra 1500 irratti sadarkaa 2ffaan  injifatee harka isaas waliin qaxxaamursee diddaa wayyaanee mul’isee injifannoo dachaa galmeessee jira.Kana kan raawwate Fulbaana 11 bara 2016 tti.  Atleet Damiseen qaama miidhamaa yoo tahu ijji isaa takk0 hin agartu.  Gootichi kun garuu addunyaa irratti  saba isaa, saba Oromoof injifannoo guddaa fi boonsaa galmeesse jira . Wanti nama ajaa’ibu garuu atileetiin kun 1ffaa bahuu ni danda’a ture. Yoo sarara seenuuf xiqqo hafuuf mallattoo fincila xumura garbummaa Oromoo mul’isuuf jedhee hanga inni harka isaa ol qabu duubaa dhufanii bira dabranii saba isaaf jedhee 2ffaa bahuuf dirqame.

Itti dabaleesi  Damisee Taammiruu yoo badhaasa fudhatuus alaabaan Itoophiyaa (wayyanee) akka ol hin baane dhoorkee yoo faaruun alaabaa Itoophiyaa faarfamtuus afaan qabatee jibba qabuuf mul’ise. Akkasumaas wayta baayyee harka isaa ol kaasuun mormii isaa irra deddeebi’ee mul’isaa ture. Atileetiin kun saba isaatiif jedhee wareegama qaalii injifannoo dachaa galmeesse. Innillee Itoophiyatti gale taanaan miidhaa hamaatu isa qunnama. Wayyaaneen aara Fayyisaa mara irratti dabalattee miiti. Kanaaf Oromoon addunyaarra jirtan akkuma inni daandii Fayyisaa Lalisaa baase irra deeme, nutiis daandii Fayyisaaf irra deemne irra haa deemnuuf. Isa waliin  ‘RioParalympic’  irra kan turan Atleet  magarsaa Taasisaa fi gazexeessaa Adunyaa Angaasuu isa waliin  mallattoo fincila xumura garbummaa agarsiisaniiru.


https://oromianeconomist.com/2016/08/29/oromia-athletic-nations-reports-the-winner-of-qebec-city-marathon-marathon-oromo-athlete-ebisa-ejigu-crossed-the-finish-line-in-an-almost-identical-fashion-as-lilesa-did-one-week-earlier-in-brazi/

Quebec City Marathon winner, Oromo athlete, Ebisa Ejigu, replicates Rio Olympic medallist’s #OromoProtests. p2

Athlete Fraol Ebissa Won the Germany 10Km race and shows his solidarity with #OromoProtestsSeptember 2016. p2

Athlete Fraol Ebissa Won the Germany 10Km race and shows his solidarity with #OromoProtests. 4 September 2016. p2

Hariyaan Furii Kaffiyaaloo jettiin,maqaan isaa,Taammiruu Kaffiyaaloo Damiseeti.Taammiruun nama ganna 23ti.

Bara 2000 keessa fiigicha jalqabee bara 2003 keessa ammoo akka dansaa dorgommii jabeeffate.Eegii sunii asitti metirii 400, 800 fi 1,500 irratti dorgoma. Haga ammaatti medaaliyaa 45 caalaa badhaafame.

Taammiruun nama biyya keessaa fi biyya alaalleetti Paralympic dorgmuun beekama.Paralympic dorgommii namii cabaa-baqaa, naafaa fi qaamii akka akkaa irraa hirdhate ka doktoriin mirkanseef irratti dorgomu.

Atileeti Taammiruu Demissee,Rio Biraazil

Atileeti Taammiruu Demissee,Rio Biraazil

Dorgommii Paralympic ta bara, 2016 Fulbaana 7-18,bara 2016 Riyoo,Biraazilitti itti jiran.Atileetota 4000 caalanitti itti jira.

Itoophiyaan dorgommii tanaaf Taammiruu waliin nama shan ergatte.Taammiruun fiigicha metirii 1,500 guyyaa dheengaddaa dorgome irratti lammeessoo bahee mallattoo mormii Oromoo agarsiise.

“Wanta biyya keessatti godhamaa jiru addunyaatti akka beekamu. Dhiiga saba kiyyaatii ka dhangala’a jiru…kan gubachaa jiru saba kiyya waan taheef—namini meeqa akka du’e hin beekna,kanaaf mormii agarsiise,”jedha.

Kanaafuu jedha Taammiruun mallatoon tun mallattoo ummatii “Oromoo hidhamuu isaa, cunqurfamuu isaa agarsiisu waan taheef agarsiise,” jedha.

Atileeti Taammiruun mallattoo mormii Oromo tana yoo dorgommii jalqabe,yoo fixe,yoo badhaasa medaaliyaa fudhate mul’isee dirree keessa fiigaa agarsiisaa ture.Yoo waltajjii irratti alaabaa Itoophiyaa oli baasan afaan qabatee faarsuu dide.

Afaan qabachuun ammoo “ummatii Oromoo osoo waan hedduu qabuu ukkamamuu isaa,osoo wannuma hundaa gochuu dandahuu afaan qabee akka homaa hin dandeennetti ilaalamuu isaa agarsiisaa,” jedha.

Taammiruun mormii tana agarsiisuuf Fayyisaatti na durse malee eegachaa ture jedha.

“Tokkoffaa baheetoo rikordii nan cabsaa tureeyyuu.Oggaa ani harka oli qabu innii gadi jedhee seeneeyyuu.Innii rakkoo hin qabuu.Anaaf rakkoo hin qabu.”

Taammiruun dorgommii jara qaamii miidhamee Paralympic keessatti dorgomaa.Innii diqqeennaan ila tokko dhabee,iltii lammeessoolleen akka dansaa lafa hin agartu.

Taammiruun waltajjii dorgommii addunyaa irratti mallatoo mormii siyaasaa agarsiisuun ‘seera malee’ jedhanii yoo fkn seera sun cabsite jedhanii medaaliyaa sirraa fuudhan maan jetta jennaan “kaan lubbuu itti dhabaa medaaliyaa narraa fuudhuun rakkoo hin qabu,” jedha.

Mormii atileetotii Itoophiyaa dorgommii biyya alaa irratti harka mataa irratti oli qabatanii mallattoo mormii hiriira Oromiyaa agarsiisuu kana, Fayyisaa Leellisaatti jalqabe.

Fayyisaa Biraazilii bahee amma Amerikaa jira.


News Week: Ethiopian Paralympian Tamiru Demisse showed solidarity with Oromia protesters—who have clashed with the country’s government—as he claimed a silver medal, following a protest gesture made by Olympic counterpart Feyisa Lilesa.

Demisse, who competed in the men’s 1,500-meter T13 race for visually impaired runners, claimed a silver medal in the race on Sunday at the Olympic Station in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. As he crossed the finish line, Demisse crossed his arms above his head.The gesture has become widely adopted among members of the Oromo people, the country’s largest ethnic group. Oromo protesters have clashed with Ethiopian security forces in recent months, with Human Rights Watch claiming the unrest has seen more than 400 people killed.


Yahoo: Ethiopia’s Tamiru Demisse (C) reacts after the final of men’s 1500m of the Rio 2016 Paralympic.

The protest by Tamiru Demisse, the silver medalist in the men’s 1,500 m in Rio de Janeiro on Sunday, comes after fellow Ethiopian runner Feyisa Lilesa made headlines during the Olympics last month when he made a similar protest as he claimed silver in the men’s marathon.


The Independent: Ethiopian Paralympic athlete Tamiru Demisse in new finishing line protest against oppressive regime. 1500m runner echoes protest of fellow countryman Feyisa Lilesa.


Daily Mail: The protest by Tamiru Demisse, the silver medalist in the men’s 1,500 m in Rio de Janeiro on Sunday, comes after fellow Ethiopian runner Feyisa Lilesa made headlines during the Olympics last month when he made a similar protest as he claimed silver in the men’s marathon.

The gesture — a sort of X above the head — is a symbol of defiance against the Ethiopian government’s crack-down on anti-government protests that started in the Oromo region in November last year.


Africa News: An Ethiopian Paralympic athlete, Tamiru Demisse, crossed his arms above his head after finishing second in the Men’s 1500m race in Rio. He did same during the medal ceremony.

Tamiru finished behind Algeria’s Abdellatif Baka who took gold in the event. His gesture follows that of fellow athlete Feyisa Lilesa who also won silver in a marathon during the Olympic Games. Kenya’s Henry Kirwa won the bronze medal.

Crossing arms is a sign of protest against Ethiopian government’s treatment of the Oromo people, the largest ethnic group in the Horn of Africa. The protests were sparked after the government began extending the municipal boundary of the country’s capital, threatening parts of Oromia and the people’s land rights.


Leia mais:Prata nos 1.500 metros T13, Tamiru Demisse protesta contra governo etíope na chegada e no pódio


Answer Africa. One famous sight from Rio Olympics 1500m race finish line has found it’s way to that of the Paralympics thanks to Tammiru Demisse.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9ODtmI-cyv4
Silver medallist Tamiru Demisse of Oromia/ Ethiopia, gold medallist Abdellatif Baka of Algeria and bronze medallist Henry Kirwa of Kenya. 11 September 2016
silver-medallist-tamiru-demisse-of-ethiopia-gold-medallist-abdellatif-baka-of-algeria-and-bronze-medallist-henry-kirwa-of-kenya-11-september-2016

oromo-oromo-athletes-tamiru-demisse-c-megersa-tasisa-l-and-sport-journalist-adugna-angasu-r-who-are-in-rio-de-janeiro-brazil-for-the-paralympic-2016-show-solidarity-in-a-world-stage-to-oromo
Demisse, Tasisa, Angasu Support Fnd

Beneficiaries of this fund are Oromo athletes Tamiru Demisse, Megersa Tasisa and sport journalist Adugna Angasu who are in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil for the Paralympic 2016. Mr. Demisse won a Silver Medal in the T13 1500 meter race and declared his support for pro-democracy movement in Ethiopia by raising his arms above his head X-style which is the symbol of #OromoProtests. Mr. Bayisa, an athlete, and Mr. Angasu, a sport journalist, from Ethiopia are also in Barzil for the Paralympic 2016. The three men fear persecution for supporting #OromoProtests if they go back to Ethiopia and are seeking political asylum. All fund raised will be used to support the beneficiaries. Please donate whatever amount you can. Thank you. Click here to go to the site

Oromo Paralympic Athletes Support Team

Help spread the word!

Oromia: Athletic Nation Report: The winner of Quebec City Marathon, Oromo athlete Ebisa Ejigu crossed the finish line in an almost-identical fashion as Fayyisaa Leellisaa (Lilesa) did one week earlier in Brazil Rio Olympic Marathon, solidarity to #OromoProtests. August 29, 2016

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Odaa OromooOromianEconomist

 

Quebec City Marathon winner, Oromo athlete, Ebisa Ejigu, replicates Rio Olympic medallist’s #OromoProtestsQuebec City Marathon winner, Oromo athlete, Ebisa Ejigu, replicates Rio Olympic medallist’s #OromoProtests. p3Quebec City Marathon winner, Oromo athlete, Ebisa Ejigu, replicates Rio Olympic medallist’s #OromoProtests. p2

 World class Oromo athletes continue to stand for freedom gold medalist in solidarity

Quebec City Marathon winner replicates Olympic medallist’s political protest

Ebisa Ejigu of Ethiopia performed a sign of protest against his home country’s government as he won the Quebec City Marathon on Sunday.

By ,  Running  August 28th, 2016


Ebisa Ejigu est le premier coureur à franchir la ligne d’arrivée en 2:30:40! Bravo!

Feyisa Lilesa of Ethiopia made headlines last Sunday when he finished second in the men’s marathon at the Olympics with his arms crossed above his head. The gesture, which was done in solidarity with the Oromo people’s anti-government protests in his home region, led Lilesa to say “If I go back to Ethiopia, they will kill me.”

 

Fayyisaa lalisaa Oromo national hero, at Rio 2016 Olympicmarathon in the podium, finishing line in #OromoProtests as winning theOlympic medal, 21 August 2016

#mcm #ManCrushMonday goes to this brave man Feyisa Lilesa BBC: An Olympic marathon runner from Ethiopia staged a daring protest against his home government when he crossed the line in Rio on Sunday. As he took the silver medal, Feyisa Lilesa crossed his arms above – a gesture made by the Oromo people who have suffered brutal police crackdowns. New York-based Human Rights Watch says that more than 400 people were killed in clashes with the security forces in Oromia, although the government disputes this figure. Rule 50 of the Olympic charter bans political displays or protests and the IOC say they are gathering information about the case. #FeyisaLilesa #OromoProtests

On Sunday, the winner of the Quebec City Marathon crossed the finish line in an almost-identical fashion as Lilesa did one week earlier in Brazil. Ebisa Ejigu, who is from Addis Ababa, ran 2:30:40 to win the SSQ Quebec City Marathon and formed an “X” with his arms across the line and into the finisher’s zone.

RELATED: Four other storylines from Sunday’s Quebec City Marathon.

Forming an “X” with their arms is a sign of protest against the government’s treatment of the Oromo people, the largest ethnic group in the Horn of Africa. The protests were sparked after the government began extending the municipal boundary of the country’s capital, threatening parts of Oromia and the people’s land rights.

The protests began in a small town named Ginchi, approximately 80 kilometres outside of the capital. Both Lilesa and Ejigu are from Addis Ababa or the surrounding area.

RELATED: Runner from Jordan finishes last in Olympic marathon but was all smiles.

Ejigu is a regular on the Canadian running scene having run the Toronto Waterfront 10K in June and winning the Mississauga Marathon in May. According to Sportstats, Ejigu has listed his place of residence as Toronto since June 25. In Quebec City, he was wearing a Toronto Olympic Club singlet. He has a lifetime marathon best of 2:12:03.

Since November 2015, Human Rights Watch reports that 400 people have been killed by the government’s security forces as part of the protests. An additional 100 people are believed to have been killed in August, according to BBC News.

Lilesa, the Olympic silver medallist, did not return to Ethiopia as scheduled after the Rio Games and is seeking asylum. The decision to not board the flight came after the government said that Lilesa would get a “heroic welcome” in Ethiopia. A crowdfunding page has raised US$157,438 in the 26-year-old’s name to cover travel costs and provide support for his wife and two children in Ethiopia.

Ejigu’s sign of protest at the Quebec City Marathon

 

WBEZ Radio: Wordview: Ethiopian Olympic Runner Protests for Oromo August 28, 2016

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Fayyisaa lalisaa Oromo national hero, After received his Rio 2016 Olympic medal, 21 August 2016Fayyisaa lalisaa Oromo national hero, at  Rio 2016 Olympicmarathon in the podium, finishing line in #OromoProtests as winning theOlympic  medal, 21 August 2016

Oromo Olympic marathon athlete Fayyisaa Lalisaa in the social and international media. #OrompProtests global icon. p7

Click here to Listen to WBEZ Radio:  The Olympic Runner Protests for Oromo

As Feyisa Lilesa crossed the finish line to win the silver medal in Rio, he crossed his raised arms in an act of defiance against the Ethiopian government’s treatment of the Oromo people. We talk about Lilesa’s protest with Oromo activist, Seenaa Jimjimo.

DW: Sports: My Picture of the Week – Symbol of protest in Rio. #OromoProtests August 27, 2016

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Oromo Olympic marathon athlete Fayyisaa Lalisaa on the Guardian. #OrompProtests global icon p1

After crossing the finishing line in Rio Olympics, the Ethiopian marathon runner Feyisa Lilesa crossed his hands over his head. #DWMyPic takes a look at this symbol of anti-government protest in Ethiopia. DW Journalist Merga Yonas Bula says that silver medalist Feyisa has risked his life and family by making this gesture of solidarity with the Oromo Protests. Click here for more ‘My Picture of the Week – Symbol of protest in Rio’ at DW.

The Guardian: Olympic medallist Feyisa Lilesa’s gesture was a plea for justice for his people August 24, 2016

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Ethiopia’s Oromo people are systematically targeted and oppressed by its ruling regime. The athlete’s crossed arms protest shouldn’t be ignored

Oromo Olympic marathon athlete Fayyisaa Lalisaa on the Guardian. #OrompProtests global icon
‘At risk to his life, and at the sacrifice of his career, Feyisa Lilesa expressed at the Olympics the collective grievances and institutional discrimination his people suffer in the Oromia region.’ Photograph: Rex/Shutterstock

When the Ethiopian Olympic marathon medallist Feyisa Lilesa crossed his arms at the finish line, the world asked what the symbol stood for. Little is known about the historical marginalisation and collective persecution of Lilesa’s people, the Oromo of north-east Africa.

Almost all Ethiopian runners come from the Oromia region; but the Ethiopian athletics federation is highly scornful of their Oromo identity. Perhaps the federation’s imperious attitude towards the athletes emanates from its paranoia and mistrust of the people, and fear that one day Oromo athletes might open Ethiopia’s Pandora’s box and spill the beans at an international sports event. Exactly what Lilesa did in Rio – and now he has not returned to Ethiopia.

At risk to his life, and at the sacrifice of his career, Lilesa was determined to express at the Olympics the collective grievances and institutional discrimination his people suffer in the Oromia region. The courageous crossing of his arms is a gesture of solidarity with the Oromo protest symbol that has been used over the last nine months in defiance of the ruling regime. In a short interview, Lelisa told what many believe is the story of the Oromo: the killings, the maimings, arbitrary detentions, profiling, enforced disappearances and economic injustices perpetrated by the Ethiopian government against the Oromo nation.

The current social and political crisis in Ethiopia was triggered by theAddis Ababa “master plan”, which was perceived by protesters as an attempt to remove the Oromo from the capital city. Even though it later dropped plans for this land grab, the regime claimed that its intention was to develop the city’s business district by further moving into the Oromo territories and neighbouring districts. No prior consultation, discussion or deliberation was had with the Oromo people, the ancestral owners of the land. Some saw this as being part of a grand scheme to ensure the long-term hegemony of the regime’s favoured ethnic group over the rest of the country. The Tigray, the regime’s dominant group, make up only 6% of the country’s population.

As Lilesa’s protest drew national attention, the situation in Ethiopia appeared to be deteriorating and having a serious impact on internal stability. It also cast a shadow of political uncertainty over the country.

Contemporary experiences teach us that economic and political inequality increases the risk of internal strife. When one ethnic group captures political power and excludes its perceived rivals, ethno-nationalist conflict is likely to increase, potentially descending into civil war. A heterogeneous society such as Ethiopia, where disparities in wealth overlap with ethnic grievances, is a good case study.

The scale of the Oromo protest over the last nine months has exposed Ethiopia’s ethnic-coded wealth distribution. According to Oxford University’s 2014Multidimensional Poverty Index (MPI), Ethiopia is the second poorest country in the world with about 58% living in acute destitution. Not all Ethiopians have benefited equally from the country’s economic growth.

The Oromia region, the nation’s agricultural breadbasket, is also the nation’s second poorest region in the federation. According to the 2014 MPI, about 90% of Oromo live in severe poverty and destitution, more than 80% of Oromo households do not have access to electricity or sanitation and more than 75% of Oromo do not have access to potable drinking water. Similarly, the UNDP’s 2014Human Development Index (HDI) placed Oromia well below the national average. Development in Ethiopia is not inclusive, not shared; many rural Ethiopians – the majority Oromo – remain in severe poverty. Oromo people are the most affected by the current drought and by the government’s response to it.

Economic inequality is echoed in the political realm. Amnesty International’s 2014 report, Because I am Oromo, chronicles targeting based on ethnic identity. Long before that, in June 2007, the UN committee on the elimination of racial discrimination had highlighted how Ethiopian military and police forces systematically targeted certain ethnic groups, in particular the Anuak and the Oromo peoples, and reported the summary executions, rape of women and girls, arbitrary detention, torture, humiliations and destruction of property and crops of members of those communities.

It is this marginalisation in the Oromia and Amhara regions that has forced the younger generation to protest in the streets, but the government response has been bloody. International human rights organisations report more than 500 lives were lost, but activists believe this figure could be more than 700. An estimated 20,000 or more people have been imprisoned, tens of thousands wounded and disappeared; many more rendered landless, homeless and jobless.

Now, with rallies taking place and with funerals in several corners of Oromia and Amhara lands, the conflict is likely to escalate and the country’s public security and stability to deteriorate. As reports continue to emerge, after several days of internet and social media blackout in the country, there is a growing fear that the regime has, knowingly or not, helped foment inter-ethnic conflict, pitting the Tigray against the Oromo and Amhara peoples. In fact, given the differences among ethnic groups, this could quickly descend into a large-scale conflict.

If there is any lesson the world can learn from Rwanda’s genocide, it is the pressing need to act as swiftly as possible to avoid this kind of worst-case scenario. Lilesa’s gesture is a request to the citizens of the world to stand with the Oromo in their quest for political and economic survival against the unjust face of Ethiopia. It is also a call for the western powers to re-evaluate their foreign policy towards Ethiopia and the Horn of Africa in the interests of real security, dignity, stability, peace and development for all the people – not a select few.

Related media articles:

Watch BBC  World Service News Hours: Ethiopian Olympic runner’s symbolic protest

 

Read at OAKLAND INSTITUTE: Feyisa Lilesa: Crossing the Line in Ethiopia

Read Untold Stories of the Silenced.



Read in Quartz: SELF-IMPOSED EXILE: The Ethiopian Olympic runner who defied his government has not returned home with the rest of his team

 

Read Yadesa Bojia: It is time to report the truth about Ethiopia!

Watch BBC  World Service News Hours: Ethiopian Olympic runner’s symbolic protest


Over $100,000 raised for Oromo Olympian, read at world Post

Read VOA: Ethiopian Diaspora Raises Over $100K to Help Protesting Olympic Athlete

Read NZ Herland: Ethiopian community to protest homeland government’s crackdown on political dissent.  “Feyisa Lilesa is our hero and we are calling on New Zealanders to join our protest, and urge the New Zealand Government to call on their Ethiopian counterparts to cease the senseless killings.”


Africa News: Streets deserted during renewed protests in some Ethiopian cities

 

NY Times video: Marathoner’s Symbol of Protest: #OromoProtests at #Rio2016 August 24, 2016

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Odaa OromooOromianEconomistHero Hero, double hero in Olympic Marathon, Rio 2016 and Oromummaa. Oromo athlete. Fayyisaa Lelisaa.Hero Hero, double hero in Olympic Marathon, Rio 2016 and Oromummaa. Oromo athlete. Fayyisaa Lelisa at press conference. p1Columbia university students in solidarity with #OpromoProtests say the Oromo students deserve justice, 22nd August 2016The Olympian has taken the Oromo call for freedom and justice global. Go go the world


 

Fayyisaa Lalisaa (Feyisa Lilesa), an athlete from Oromia/  Ethiopia, caught the world’s attention Sunday 21 August 2016 when, at the finish line of the Olympic marathon, he raised his arms in solidarity with the Oromo people in his country. This is NY Times Video:-

 

Realted:-

Oromia: Athletic Nation Report: #Rio2016 Olympic Marathon: Oromo athlete Fayyisaa Lalisaa has demonstrated his Solidarity to #OromoProtests as he wins silver medal. Oromian Economist August 21, 2016

 

Oromia: Athletic nation Report: Short poem (Rio) about Oromo Olympian Fayyisaa Lalisaa, the world icon of #OromoProtests (the call for social justice).                      Oromian Economist  August 23, 2016

 

SB Nation: Olympian Fayyisaa Lalisaa stood up to Ethopia’s state-sanctioned violence and became a national hero August 23, 2016

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Odaa OromooOromianEconomist

Hero Hero, double hero in Olympic Marathon, Rio 2016 and Oromummaa. Oromo athlete. Fayyisaa Lelisa at press conference. p1Feyisa Lelisa Support Fund, #OromoProtests icon

Oromo Olympic marathon athlete Fayyisaa Lalisaa in the social and international media. #OrompProtests global icon. p7 



Olympian Feyisa Lilesa stood up to Ethopia’s state-sanctioned violence and became a national hero

Fayyisaa lalisaa Oromo national hero, at Rio 2016 Olympicmarathon in the podium, finishing line in #OromoProtests as winning theOlympic medal, 21 August 2016

Photo by Buda Mendes/Getty Images

Why Lilesa’s simple act of making an “X” with his arms after winning an Olympic medal was a watershed moment for so many Ethiopian people.

 

After nabbing a silver medal in Olympic marathon, Ethiopian runner Feyisa Lilesa hoisted his arms inches above his head in the form of an “X.”

With a seemingly innocuous gesture, the 150-pound black man was actually displaying a symbol of solidarity with the Oromo people of Ethiopia, who have protested the government’s reallocation of their land. At least 400 local protesters were killed by Ethiopian security forces over the last year, according to Human Rights Watch. The “X” symbol that Lilesa showed came into widespread use in Ethiopia four and half years ago by protesters as a mark of unarmed, civil resistance.

Following his demonstration, which he repeated on the medal stand, Lilesa toldreporters in Rio De Janeiro, “If I go back to Ethiopia, the government will kill me.” That’s the cost of protesting a government in Ethiopia that controls its media and stifles those who speak out against its will.

: to @ESATtv “many are dying and the regime must be removed by collective action”


After Lilesa’s protest, James Peterson, the Director of Africana Studies at Lehigh University spoke to many Ethiopians in America who felt galvanized by the gesture despite the ongoing human rights violations in their homeland.

“There are a lot of complicated things folks don’t understand about continental African politics,” Peterson said. “Addis (Ababa) as a city is sort of engaged in this moment of neoliberal straw. The city is trying to expand at the expense of these rural and suburban settlements that have been in place for like thousands of years. For an Ethiopian athlete, on the largest stage of any Ethiopian of the world right now at the Olympics, to be in solidarity with them, I don’t think it’s too much to say this is the equivalent of some of the most courageous, solidarity protests that we’ve seen in athletics.”

Olympians have long used the games as a stage to draw attention to national causes.Tommie Smith and John Carlos gave a black power salute on the podium at the 1968 Summer Olympics during an American wave of Civil Rights. After Simone Manuel’s historic gold medal, she also spoke out about police brutality and black lives in America.

Such acts have caused the International Olympic Committee executive board to ban political or religious demonstrations in multiple ways in their Olympic Charter Rule 50and can result in the “disqualification or withdrawal of the accreditation of the person concerned.”

Yet for Lilesa’s protest, his defiance of the Ethiopian government didn’t open up a new wave of Oromo activism. But it did demonstrate their current struggle for the world’s purview.

“Ethiopia has been praised as a poster child for peace and stability in the last 25 years. Western governments that continued financing this government, including the U.S. Government, have turned their eyes away,” Tsedale Lemma, the editor-in-chief of the Addis Standard, a monthly magazine focusing on Ethiopian current affairs from the country’s capital Addis Ababa, told SB Nation.

“To be able to tell this to the world, where everyone can see, on this stage was monumental,” she said. “It was telling the world to its face that this country, this poster child of peace, isn’t that way. It’s killing its own people. When everyone kept silent in the wake of this excessive killing, this young man (protested) at the great cost that he might not be able to come back to his country afterwards.”

Lemma’s magazine shares the same views as Lilesa. In January, it published a widely shared cover. Employees were intimidated and threatened, and the publication’s subscription numbers in Ethiopia have drastically declined for questioning the government.

#OromoProtests image, Addis Standard
The January 2016 cover of the Addis Standard, provided by Tsedale Lemma

Since the Ethiopian government announced plans in 2014 to expand the territory of the capital Addis Ababa, the country has been racked with protests resulting in hundreds of deaths at the hands of the government. Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn wanted to further Addis Ababa’s territory into Oromia, where Lilesa lives.

Doing so would displace many of the Oromo people in Ethiopia who work on farmlands. It’s similar to American eminent domain, the right of the government or its agents to expropriate private property for public use. Oromo people are the largest ethnic group in Ethiopia, accounting for nearly 40 percent of its population, according to a 2007 census.

Historically, the Oromo people have been marginalized by the government. Protests started in November; and though the government has dropped proposals to widen the capital in January, protests have continued, though, with citizens corralling for wider freedoms.

Local residents and Oromos between the United States and Ethiopia have claimed that thousands have also been jailed. Many incidents happened where the Oromo have gone to the streets and they almost always end in violence. They are killed. They are exiled or tried for treason. At best, the protestors just disappear from sight.

Within Ethiopia, Oromos mostly expressed their support for Lilesa on social media, Lemma said. Current government mandates do not tolerate people flooding the streets for celebration, particularly not for a man that flashed a symbol that is the nightmare for a regime in front of billions of people.

State-run media only showed a censored version of the marathon Lilesa won, and completely blocked his protest at the games. Some have refused to mention his name at all. But in the United States, where Ethiopians are the fifthlargest source of black immigrants, their ebullience was overflowing.

“Among his compatriots, including those in the diaspora, Lilesa’s protest was welcomed with tears of joy,” said Mohammed Ademo, the founder and editor of OPride.com that aggregates Oromo news. “A hero was born out of relative obscurity. A GoFundMe account was set up within hours. I have no doubt that it will be remembered as a watershed moment in the history of Oromo people.

“Kids will be named after him. Revolutionary songs and poems will be written in his honor. For a people who have been silenced for so long this is likely to embolden and generate more momentum for the budding movement in Ethiopia.”


The overwhelming thought is that the plight of the Oromo people, and Lilesa’s protest shedding light on it, are not what Ethiopia wants the world to know. It is an extremely censored country, where most newspapers and other outlets are either controlled or affiliated with the government.

One woman, who asked for anonymity to speak to SB Nation because she feared the consequences of speaking out against the Ethiopian regime for her and her family, said that when she last visited Ethiopia around the start of the protests, the government had blocked internet service and scrambled social media apps to stop people from collaborating by using them, a form of silencing dissent.

She said Lilesa’s feat exemplifies how fearful a lot of the Ethiopian diaspora is to speak out on this subject.

“(Lilesa) acknowledged the significance of this dialogue and that he may never walk the land he’s from or see his family again,” she said. “It was meaningful and it’s going to spur the type of international engagement that is necessary to challenge the Ethiopian government to recognize their faults and consider what a just government looks like.”

American media still largely ignores the African continent and most news organizations have dramatically cut their African bureaus or rely on one person to cover the entire continent. There’s more coverage generally on terrorism with direct implications for American national security, Ademo said.

There also hasn’t been much coverage of the Oromo protests. One reason is because Oromia has largely been off-limits to journalists since the protests began, and those who go to Ethiopia often face insurmountable hurdles for access, Ademo said.

Even Lilesa’s dominance as a marathoner is unique for Ethiopia. Ethnic Oromo athletes of all genders have often been erased from Ethiopian lore, yet they are the first black Africans to win Olympic gold, Ademo said. Abebe Bikila did so in the 1960s while running barefoot and Derartu Tulu followed in the 1992 and 2000 Olympics. Yet behind the scenes these same athletes faced implicit and explicit biases.

Few Oromo athletes spoke Amharic, a language of power in Ethiopia, and they were never sent with Oromo translators. They often had to operate by the doctrine of the country’s current rulers and the official Olympics body to compete, Ademo said.

Fayyisaa lalisaa Oromo national hero, After received his Rio 2016 Olympic medal, 21 August 2016
Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images

Within Ethiopia, those who protest see these same issues at the micro level. Lemma described a phrase many have used to explain the discrimination and marginalization the Oromo face. Oromo have said “the prisons in Ethiopia speak Afaan Oromo,” the native language of the Oromo, which shows the disproportionate rate at which Oromo are jailed in Ethiopia.

Video this month, obtained by the Associated Press, showed Ethiopian security forces beating, kicking and dragging protestors during a demonstration in the capital as they cowered and fell to the ground.

This same fight to upend oppression in Ethiopia is one being done by current American black protestors at the height of a renewed wave of activism. Lilesa’s protest spoke to some on a bigger level. Because just like black lives, African lives also have value.

“Not even in just this particular incident, but the dominance of black athletes on the global stage is in a sense of protest, especially when you have representatives of countries under such oppression as Ethiopia and the black America,” said Kwame Rose, an activist from Baltimore most known for his stand-off with Fox News commentator Geraldo Rivera after Freddie Grey’s death.

“What he did would get a lot of people killed in Ethiopia and could’ve gotten his medal stripped,” Rose continued. “This was the time to send a message, not only about competing as an athlete, but surviving as a human and trying to better humanity.”

The reality is that what Lilesa did might not change anything for the Oromo people, but his demonstration had much more validity than to be limited to just that notion.

Ademo said it provided a crucial show of inspiration for people being disproportionately jailed, that are unheard and have yearned for a change in their government.

“In the context of this long and tortuous history, Lilesa’s protest was revolutionary. Beyond the politics within the Ethiopian Olympics federation, his gesture brought much-needed attention to escalating human rights abuses in Ethiopia,” Ademo said.

Lilesa’s act was a moment to show the shackles of systemic oppression binding the Oromo people. He took their fight to the international stage.

Oromia: Athletic nation Report: Short poem (Rio) about Oromo Olympian Fayyisaa Lalisaa, the world icon of #OromoProtests (the call for social justice) August 23, 2016

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Odaa OromooOromianEconomist

 

 

Oromo Olympic marathon athlete Fayyisaa Lalisaa in the social and international media. #OrompProtests global icon. p7

 

 

Feyisa Lelisa Support Fund, #OromoProtests iconFeyisa Lelisa, Oromo Olympic Marathon silver medalist and #OromoProtests global icon and Eliud Kipchoge of Kenya, Rio 2016 Olympic Marathon Gold medallistOromo Olympic marathon athlete Fayyisaa Lalisaa in the social and international media. #OrompProtests global icon. p6

 

 

Rio: Short Poem

 

 

 

 

And also watch …………….

BBC World News 23 August 2016  Fayyisaa Lalisaa

 

Athlete with a cause

Oromo athlete, Fayyisaa Lalisaa (Feyisa Lelisa), who finished 2nd and took Silver in  Rio 2016 Olympic in men’s Marathon, crossed the finishing line with his hands crossed, an iconic  sign of Oromo social resistance  (#OromoProtests) to injustices and tyranny in Ethiopia.  Rio Olympic Marathon was held on 21 August 2016 and its the final day of the Olympic Games.  Fayyee has made  an Olympic history on Olympic history.  made solidarity to  #OromoProtests in the podium and at medal and after press conference.

The Significance and importance of his  heroic solidarity is very understandable for those have  followed the #OromoProtests the last 2 years.

 

Oromia: Athletic Nation Reports: Crowdfunding campaign for #OromoProtests world icon, Rio 2016 Olympian, Fayyisaa Lalisaa has been exceeding the target. Dirmannan Goota Oromoo Fayyisaa Lalisaaf ta’aa jiru hamma abdatamee oli ta’aa jira.

 

 

The Independent News: Ethiopian state TV censors #Rio2016 Olympic marathon runner’s finishing line #OromoProtests

 

The Independent News: Ethiopian state TV censors #Rio2016 Olympic marathon runner’s finishing line #OromoProtests August 22, 2016

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Ethiopia’s state-owned TV network has refused to broadcast footage of one of its most successful Olympic athletes crossing the finishing line or receiving his medal after he staged a political protest against oppression back home.

Feyisa Lilesa won silver in the men’s marathon on the last day of events in Rio, making him Ethiopia’s joint second most successful performer after the country won just one gold in a disappointing campaign.

As he crossed the line on Sunday he raised his arms to form an “X”, a symbol of defiance that has been used by the Oromo people in Ethiopia as part of political protests against the government.

Lilesa repeated the act in a press conference after the race, and said he would repeat it at the medal ceremony later. He told reporters he faced being killed for doing so if he returns home after the Games.

EBC, the Ethiopian state broadcaster, was showing Lila’s race live on TV on Sunday afternoon. As such, it was unable to avoid airing his protest as it happened the first time.

But the moment he crossed the line was cut from subsequent bulletins and, unlike with its other champions, EBC refused entirely to show footage of Lilesa being given his silver medal.

Shown Live on TV “-n marathoner Fayisa shows protest gesture after winning Silver at http://debirhan.com/?p=10275 

Photo published for Ethiopian marathoner Fayisa shows gesture after winning Silver at #Rio2016

Ethiopian marathoner Fayisa shows gesture after winning Silver at #Rio2016

On its website, EBC carried a report on the result entitled “Ethiopia wins Silver medal in men’s marathon”.

While its online reports from other Rio events tended to show pictures of victorious athletes after they had finished competing, the Lilesa article was accompanied by an image of a group of the marathon runners halfway through the race.

Neither online nor on TV did the state-run broadcaster make direct reference to Lilesa’s protest.

The athlete is from Oromia, home to many of the 35 million Oroma people, Ethiopia’s largest ethnic group. At the press conference, he said: “The Ethiopian government is killing my people, so I stand with all protests anywhere, as Oromo is my tribe. My relatives are in prison and if they talk about democratic rights they are killed.”

Lilesa told reporters he would be killed or put in prison if he returned home, and said he feared for his wife and two children who are still in Ethiopia. He said he plans to try and stay in Brazil or make his way to the US.


Klick here to read more at Independent

Oromia: Athletic Nation Reports: Crowdfunding campaign for #OromoProtests world icon, Rio 2016 Olympian, Fayyisaa Lalisaa has been exceeding the target. Dirmannan Goota Oromoo Fayyisaa Lalisaaf ta’aa jiru hamma abdatamee oli ta’aa jira. August 22, 2016

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Odaa OromooOromianEconomist

Feyisa Lelisa Support Fund, #OromoProtests iconHero Hero, double hero in Olympic Marathon, Rio 2016 and Oromummaa. Oromo athlete. Fayyisaa Lelisa. p1

Hero Hero, double hero in Olympic Marathon, Rio 2016 and Oromummaa. Oromo athlete. Fayyisaa Lelisa as he speaking to media plHero Hero, double hero in Olympic Marathon, Rio 2016 and Oromummaa. Oromo athlete. Fayyisaa Lelisaa.

Feyisa Lelisa, Oromo Olympic Marathon silver medalist and #OromoProtests global icon and Eliud Kipchoge of Kenya, Rio 2016 Olympic Marathon Gold medallist.

Feyisa Lelisa, Oromo Olympic Marathon silver medalist and #OromoProtests global icon and Eliud Kipchoge of Kenya, Rio 2016 Olympic Marathon Gold medallist

 

Dhábasá W. Gemelal‪#‎OromoProtests‬-Mother and son stand together at different places but for common goal!! Oromia shall be free!! Freedom for all!!

Deessuu garaa qamadii, haadha gootaa.

Oromo Olympic marathon athlete Fayyisaa Lalisaa in the social and international media. #OrompProtests global icon. p5

 

Oromo Olympic marathon athlete Fayyisaa Lalisaa in the social and international media. #OrompProtests global iconOromo Olympic marathon athlete Fayyisaa Lalisaa in the social and international media. #OrompProtests global icon. plOromo Olympic marathon athlete Fayyisaa Lalisaa in the social and international media. #OrompProtests global icon. p2Oromo Olympic marathon athlete Fayyisaa Lalisaa in the social and international media. #OrompProtests global icon. p3Oromo Olympic marathon athlete Fayyisaa Lalisaa in the social and international media. #OrompProtests global icon. p4Oromo Olympic marathon athlete Fayyisaa Lalisaa in the social and international media. #OrompProtests global icon. p6

Los Angeles Times@latimes 

 

Olympic Medalist Feyisa Lilesa Fears for His Life on Return to Ethiopia
The marathon runner made a symbolic protest against the government crackdown in Ethiopia

 

 

Olympic marathon runner Feyisa Lilesa ‘could be killed’ after protest against Ethiopian government

 

At the Olympic marathon finish line in Rio on Sunday, Feyisa Lilesa from Ethiopia staged a protest that he says could get him arrested or killed 


Ummati Oromoo bakka jiranitti gootummaa Fayyisaa Leellisaa sadarkaa addunyaatti dalage akka haaromsan ABOn dhaame.

ABOn tarkaanfii boonsaa Gootichi ilma Oromoo atileet Fayyisaa Leellisaa kaleessa Hagayya 21 2016 maaraatoonii olompikii Riotti gaggeeffame
irratti fudhate ilaalchisee ibsa baaseen “Fayyisaa Leellisaa: Ilma Ummatni Oromoo Itti Boonuu Qabu,” jedhe.

Itti dabaluunis, seenaa qabsoo Oromoo keessatti injifannoo olaanaa galmeessame kana dinqisiifatee, ummati Oromoo, keessayyuu atileetoti Oromoo marti qabsoo Oromootti xumura gochuuf bakka jiranitti tarkaanfii boonsaa walfakkaataa akka fudhatan waamicha godheera.

Kana malees, sabboonticha ilma Oromoo kana lammiileen Oromoo hiree itti qaban hundi isa cinaa hiriiruun gargaarsa barbaachisu hundaan akka bira dhaabbatan waamicha isaa dabarseera.  Guutuu isaa kan fulduree kana tuqa dubbisaa: ilma-ummatni-oromoo-itti-boonuu-qabu


Oromo athlete, Fayyisaa Lalisaa (Feyisa Lelisa), who finished 2nd and took Silver in  Rio 2016 Olympic in men’s Marathon, crossed the finishing line with his hands crossed, an iconic  sign of Oromo social resistance  (#OromoProtests) to injustices and tyranny in Ethiopia.  Rio Olympic Marathon was held on 21 August 2016 and its the final day of the Olympic Games.  Fayyee has made  an Olympic history on Olympic history.  made solidarity to  #OromoProtests in the podium and at medal and after press conference.

The Significance and importance of his  heroic solidarity is very understandable for those have  followed the #OromoProtests the last 2 years.

That is sign now widely recognized all over  Ethiopia as a symbol of civil resistance.  Ethiopia has been  gripped by successive anti-government protests which the recent one began in Nov. 2015 in Gincii  (Ginchi) town, Oromia state. 


BBC Africa Live ( 22 August 2016)  has reported the following:

Lilesa crossed his arms above – a gesture made by the Oromo people who have suffered brutal police crackdowns – as he finished the race. 

He now fears for his life and says he might be forced to move to another country. 

Organisers say that the fundraising drive had initially targeted $10,000 (£7,628) but it had been exceeded within an hour. 

They say they have since revised the target to $40,000 and have so far raised 33,000. 

The gesture has been made by the Oromo people

Lilesa is from Oromia, home to most of Ethiopia’s 35 million Oromo people.

He repeated the protest gesture later at a press conference.

 

 

Feyisa Lelisa Support Fund, #OromoProtests icon

 Click here to the link:

Feyisa Lelisa Support Fund

We are calling on all Ethiopians and human rights advocates to make contributions to funds needed to support Marathon athlete Feyisa Lelisa who exhibited extra-odrinary heroism by becoming an international symbol for #OromoProtests and Ethiopian Freedom Movement after winning a medal at the Rio de Janeiro
Olympic games today August 21, 2016.

Feyisa Lelisa faces persecution if he goes back to Ethiopia and he has decided to to seek assylum.  Funds are needed to support him and his family in the meantime,  Please donate whatever amount you can.  We assure you all the money collected will go to support this Oromo/Ethiopian hero.

Co-sponsered by Abdi Fite, Lalisaa Hikaa and Solomon Ungashe


 

 

Utuubaa sibilaa
Fayyee sanyi dhiiraa
Goota lammiin leellisuu
Akkuma Fayyee Garasuu
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lQQwKHtw8YY&feature=youtu.be

 

Oromia: Athletic Nation Report: #Rio2016 Olympic Marathon: Oromo athlete Fayyisaa Lalisaa has demonstrated his Solidarity to #OromoProtests as he wins silver medal August 21, 2016

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Oromo athlete, Fayyisaa Lalisaa (Feyisa Lelisa), who finished 2nd and took Silver in  Rio 2016 Olympic in men’s Marathon, crossed the finishing line with his hands crossed, an iconic  sign of Oromo social resistance  (#OromoProtests) to injustices and tyranny in Ethiopia.  Rio Olympic Marathon was held on 21 August 2016 and its the final day of the Olympic Games.  Fayyee has made  an Olympic history on Olympic history.  made solidarity to  #OromoProtests in the podium and at medal and after press conference.

The Significance and importance of his  heroic solidarity is very understandable for those have  followed the #OromoProtests the last 2 years.

That is sign now widely recognized all over  Ethiopia as a symbol of civil resistance.  Ethiopia has been  gripped by successive anti-government protests which the recent one began in Nov. 2015 in Gincii  (Ginchi) town, Oromia state. 

The tyrannic and corrupt Ethiopian regime discriminates and conducts mass killings against Oromo people. Even under these harsh condition, 7 of  the 8 medals counted to Ethiopia in Rio Olympics are won by Oromo athletes. Click here to read AFRICA: Oromia: Athletic Nation Report: Oromo Runners in Ethiopia Say They Face Discrimination

 

Fayisa Lalisa brings silver at Rio Olympics and turns it into pure Gold by defiantly standing with his people and against the terrorist regime that is massacring people, Says Jawar Mohammad, analyst and Oromia Media Network (OMN) Director.

Various sources misspelled his name as Lilesa but the correct one is ‘Lalisa’ or ‘Lalisaa’ in Afaan Oromoo. Fayyisaa means the healer. Lalisaa means  (making) adorable, (giving) glory.

marathon runner who came on 2nd Lilesa just flashed the crossed hands sign as he crossed finish line. Emmanuel Igunza@EmmanuelIgunza BBC Africa Correspondent

Brave. Ethiopian silver medallist in the marathon makes crossed hands gesture of Barry Malone @malonebarry Online editor, Al Jazeera English

Feyisa Lilesa showing solidarity with protesters in Ethiopia #Marathon

Jabaa gaafa biyyaa! Hero Hero! Double Hero in #Rio2016 men’s Olympic Marathon & Oromummaa. Oromo athlete Fayyisaa #Lelisa. 

Hero Hero, double hero in Olympic Marathon, Rio 2016 and Oromummaa. Oromo athlete. Fayyisaa Lelisa. p1Hero Hero, double hero in Olympic Marathon, Rio 2016 and Oromummaa. Oromo athlete. Fayyisaa Lelisaa.

Fayyisaa Lalisaa haadha warraafi ilmaan lama Itoophiyaadhaa akka qabuufi yoo gale ajjeefamuu ykn hidhamuu akka danda’u himee ta qabsoo ummata isaa cinaa dhaabbachuurraa akka sodaatee hin dhiisin hima, Chris Chavez gaazexeessaan Sport Illustrated! Ibsa agaazexeessitootaaf kenne irratti alaabaa Oromiyaa gonfoo harkaa godhateeti.

 

 

Athlete Fayyisaa Lalisaa (Marathon medalist at Rio Olympics  21 August 2016) is the first Oromo Olympian to publicly address the Oromo people cause to the world community, OMN news.

 

 

 

OMN: Injifannoo Atleetii Fayyisaa Lalisaa Ilaalchisee

Hero Hero, double hero in Olympic Marathon, Rio 2016 and Oromummaa. Oromo athlete. Fayyisaa Lelisa at press conference. p1

Hero Hero, double hero in Olympic Marathon, Rio 2016 and Oromummaa. Oromo athlete. Fayyisaa Lelisa as he speaking to mediaHero Hero, double hero in Olympic Marathon, Rio 2016 and Oromummaa. Oromo athlete. Fayyisaa Lelisa as he speaking to media pl

Fayyisaa Lelisaa speaks out against the Ethiopian government. His pose at the finish line was in protest of the killing of the Omoro people.
He told reporters that “in nine months, more than 1,000 people have died from government harm.”
Lalisa says that if he goes back to Ethiopia, they could kill him, they could put him in prison or keep him in the airport.
“If I go back to ‪#‎ETH‬, they will kill me.”
Fayisa Lalisa plans to protest at tonight’s closing ceremony when the marathoners get their medals. ‪#‎Rio2016‬.
He has a wife and 2 kids at home.
Background
Feyisa Lalisa is a male long-distance runner from Oromia. He became the youngest man to run under 2:06 hours when he set his personal best in the men’s marathon at the 2010 Rotterdam Marathon. He was born February 1, 1990 (age 26), in Jaldu, West Showa, Oromia, East Africa.

 

(Advocacy4Oromia) With the eyes of the world upon him, Oromo marathoner Feyisa Lalisa used the stage of Sunday’s Olympic marathon to daringly protest his own government back home.

Lalisa

As he neared the finish line and a silver medal, Lelisa raised his arms to form an “X.” The gesture is a peaceful protest made by the Oromo people, the largest ethnic group in Ethiopia and one that is facing a brutal response to widespread protests that began late last year.

Human Rights Watch estimated in June that 400 people have been killed and thousands more injured as the government attempted to stop the estimated 500 protests that the Oromo people staged to draw attention to systemic persecution by the government.

Lelisa is from Oromia, which is home to a large majority of the country’s 35 million Oromo. He didn’t back down from the protest after the race either, flashing the sign for cameras at a press conference and pledging to do it again during Sunday night’s closing ceremony.

Rule 50 of the Olympic charter bans political displays or protests, and the American duo of Tommie Smith and John Carlos was famously suspended by the USOC after the pair flashed the black power salute on the medal stand at the 1968 Summer Games.

Lelisa, however, has bigger things to worry about than the IOC response as such dissent puts his life in real danger if he returns to Ethiopia. He told reporters afterward that he would seek a visa to stay in Brazil or possibly come to the United States. He also said that his wife and two children are still back in Ethiopia.

Click here to read report on : Fascist Ethiopia’s regime has continued with mass killings of Oromo children, mass arrests and genocide against Oromo people.

 

Click on this and next  links as media reporting Fayyisaa Lelisa:-

Explaining his actions, Lilesa said: “The Ethiopian government are killing the Oromo people and taking their land and resources so the Oromo people are protesting and I support the protest as I am Oromo. click here for more at BBC.

Lilesa crossed the finish line with his wrists crossed high in the air as a protest. He also challenged the world community for supporting a killing regime in his country.

Silver medalist Feyisa Lilesa repeated his protest on the podium.

 

 

Γιατί αυτή η χειρονομία μπορεί να κοστίσει τη ζωή του αργυρού ολυμπιονίκη Feyisa Lilesa;

Ethiopian runner in ‘Deaths’ protest

Feyisa Lilesa, a legbátrabb sportoló azolimpián

Nummer twee van marathon wil niet meer terug naar Ethiopië uit vrees voor zijn leven

 

JO 2016: Médaille d’argent sur le marathon, un Ethiopien défie son gouvernement sur le podium

 

The whole world should keep in mind that this is not the first time that athlete Feyisa Lelisa protested against all sorts of tyranny & the Ethiopian state sponsored terrorism on civilians. Another Oromo athlete Lelisa Desisa was one of the very few athletes who devoted his Boston Marathon Medal to the Boston terror victims on April 15, 2013, in the US. We hope that the US foreign Ministry also recognizes this fact about these brave Oromo athletes very well. Naf-tanan Gaadullo

Boston Marathon winner will donate medal to honor bombing victims

Oromia: Athletic Nation Report: Rio Olympics: Shoeless runner Oromo athlete Etenesh Diro becomes a hero Olympian in steeplechase August 14, 2016

Posted by OromianEconomist in Africa, Athletic nation, Oromia, Oromo, Oromo Sport.
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Odaa OromooOromianEconomist

As history repeats itself, barefoot Oromo athlete Abbabaa Bqilaa (Abebe Bikila), winner of Rome Olympic Marathon in 1964.

Oromo athlete Abebe Bikila (Abbabaa Biqilaa), barefoot, won Rome Olympic in 1960.

Oromo athlete Etenesh Diro of Oromia, representing Ethiopia in Rio 2016 Olympics  competes in the Women’s 3000m Steeplechase heat.Etenesh Diro, Oromo athlete in Rio Olympics become an Olympic hero

Oromo athlete Etenesh Diro of Oromia, representing Ethiopia in Rio 2016 Olympics  competes in the Women’s 3000m Steeplechase heat.

 

Etenesh Diro, Oromo athlete in Rio Olympics become an Olympic hero p1
Oromo athlete  Etenesh Diro — one of the favourites in the women’s 3000m steeplechase — was sitting comfortably in first place about two-thirds into her heat at the Olympics when disaster struck.
Her heel was clipped by a falling opponent, sending her tumbling to the ground and removing her right shoe.

 

Etenesh Diro, Oromo athlete in Rio Olympics become an Olympic hero p2
Etenesh Diro reacts after she competed in the Women’s 3000m Steeplechase. Picture: AFP

 

The 25-year-old stood and quickly tried to put it back on her foot, but the laces were tied tight and with no time to spare she cast it aside.
Realising she’d have a better chance of running barefoot, her sock went too — and the African set about attempting to fight her way back into a race where only the first three placegetters were guaranteed of progressing to the final.

 

Etenesh Diro, Oromo athlete in Rio Olympics become an Olympic hero
Oromia’s Etenesh Diro competes in the Women’s 3000m Steeplechase.
To say the crowd at Rio’s Maracana Stadium got behind her was an understatement.
With every step of Diro’s barren hoof the energy went up a notch — and she responded by passing several runners in the final few laps to claim seventh.

After the race Diro dropped to the ground in disappointment as competitors offered their support.
She’d failed to qualify and lost the opportunity to improve on a sixth-placed finish in London. But then something heartwarming happened.
Three teams involved in the race protested.

Etenesh Diro, Oromo athlete in Rio Olympics become an Olympic hero p3

Etenesh Diro (L) is helped by officials after she competed in the Women’s 3000m Steeplechase heat. Picture: AFP

Diro had been unfairly brought down and along with Jamaica’s Aisha Praught and Ireland’s Sara Treacy — who also fell after being impeded — would be given a place in the final, which expanded to 18 runners.
She will now be the fan favourite in the final, which also features Australian Genevieve LaCaze and starts at 12.15am Tuesday AEST.


 

Oromia: Injifannoo: Athletic Nation Report: Rio Olympics: Oromo Athlete Almaz Ayaana becomes the new world and Olympic records holder in 10,000 meters August 12, 2016

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Odaa OromooOromo athlete Almaz Ayana is Olympic Champion with new world record. Tirunesh Dibaba is 3rd at #Rio2016


Rio Olympics: Almaz Ayaana becomes the new world record holder in 10,000 meters

 

 Oromo athlete Tirunesh Dibaba, winner of the last two Olympic titles, overtook early leader Alice Aprot of Kenya to get the bronze medal in 29:42.56, a lifetime best that was 14 seconds faster than the previous Olympic record she set in 2008.

An Oromo athlete, Almaz Ayana,  becomes the fastest runner ever seen before.  She ran the fastest 10 000m race in history in 29:17.45 during the 2016 Summer Olympics beating the previous world record by more than 14 seconds, a record that Wang Junxia had held for 23 years. Junxia had held for 23 years.

Oromo athlete Almaz Ayana is Olympic Champion with new world record. #Rio2016

Almaz Ayana Eba (born 21 November 1991) competes in the 3000 metres and 5000 metres event. She set a new 10000 metres world record, breaking the old one set in 1993, during the Rio 2016 Summer Olympics.



She won bronze medal in 5000 m event at the 2013 World Championships in Athletics held in Moscow, Russia. In the 2015 IAAF World Championships in Beijing, Almaz won the 5000m course beating Genzebe Dibaba by a long distance.

Almaz won her first senior title over 5000 metres at the 2014 African Championships in Marrakech, defeating favourite Genzebe Dibaba in a championship record time of 15:32.72.  One month later in the same stadium, she won the 5000m representing Africa at the 2014 IAAF Continental Cup by over 24 seconds.

Almaz ran a personal best of 14:14.32 over 5000 metres at the IAAF Diamond League meeting in Shanghai in 2015, improving upon her previous record of 14:25.84 which she had set in Paris in 2013. This made her the third fastest female athlete over that distance, behind compatriots Tirunesh Dibaba, the world record holder, and Meseret Defar.

On June 2, 2016 Almaz Ayana ran 5000 metres in 14:12.59 at IAAF Golden Gala in Rome. This made Almaz the second fastest woman ever on 5000 metres, second only to Tirunesh Dibaba, who holds the world record of 14:11.15.

Rio Olympics 2016


The Oromian athlete  representing Ethiopia takes 14 seconds off a 23-year-old mark; Molly Huddle breaks the U.S. record.

Last year’s world champion, Vivian Cheruiyot of Kenya, took silver in 29:32.53, just off of the previous world record of 29:31.78, set by Wang Junxia of China in 1993. Oromo athlete Tirunesh Dibaba, winner of the last two Olympic titles, overtook early leader Alice Aprot of Kenya to get the bronze medal in 29:42.56, a lifetime best that was 14 seconds faster than the previous Olympic record she set in 2008.

Molly Huddle of USA finished sixth in 30:13.17, an American record that took 9 seconds off the mark Shalane Flanagan set while winning bronze at the 2008 Games. Emily Infeld finished 11th in 31:26.94, a personal best. The third American, Marielle Hall, finished in 33rd in 32:39.32.

Aprot, who had the world-leading time heading into the race, set a fast pace from the start. She led a group of seven through halfway in 14:46.81, just off of world record pace. Huddle ran with the leaders through the first four kilometers, but then fell off, which is understandable given that the leaders passed 5,000 meters just 4 seconds slower than her U.S. record at the distance.

But even Aprot’s pace was too slow for Ayana, who surged into the lead and broke the pack apart with 12 laps to go. She used the same punishing solo front-running style to break Genzabe Dibaba (Tirunesh’s younger sister) in the 5,000 at the world championships last year. Cheruiyot, who has a strong finishing kick, kept Ayana within a few seconds for several laps, but then couldn’t hang on, leaving only the question of by how much Ayana would break the world record.

Ayana, the second fastest in history at 5,000 meters, is new to the 10,000; her Olympic title and world record was only her second time contesting the distance.