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Oromia: Athletic Nation Report: The amazing victories of Oromo Athletes Almaz Ayana and Tirunesh Dibaba in IAAF World Championships, 10,000m in London 2017. Tamirat Tola (Silver) in Marathon August 13, 2017

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The amazing victories of Oromo Athletes Almaz Ayana (Gold) and Tirunesh Dibaba (Silver) in IAAF World Championships, 10,000m race in London 2017.

 

 

Olympic champion Ayana destroys field to win 10,000 metres 

(Reuters, London) The Olympic champion began pulling away from the field after 10 laps, sweeping past back markers who were made to look sluggish in comparison.

She finished in 30:16.32 seconds, well outside the world record she set when she won in Rio last year but still enough to win by an astonishing 46.37 seconds, by far the biggest margin in championship history.

Ayana’s compatriot Tirunesh Dibaba, the former world and Olympic champion, added to her impressive collection of medals when he took the silver with Kenya’s Agnes Tirop in third.


 

 

REPORT: WOMEN’S 10,000M FINAL – IAAF WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS LONDON 2017

 

(IAAF,  5 August 2017, London) While the Olympic final last year went out at close to world record pace from the get-go, the first three kilometres were covered in a cumbersome nick but with the clock showing a fraction inside ten minutes after the first three kilometres, Ayana cut loose and put on a display second only to her world record performance at the Olympics last year.

Only Turkey’s Yasemin Can tried to follow Ayana’s break but the reigning European champion – finding this field a step up in calibre to the continent fields she has dominated in recent seasons – soon paid for trying to cling onto the leader’s coat-tails, eventually fading back to 11th in 31:35.48 and getting lapped in the process.

Ayana covered the tenth and eleventh laps in 67.41 and 67.89 respectively before reaching halfway in 15:51.38 with a seven second advantage on Can, who was dropping back into the chasing pack which included the Kenyan triumvirate headed by Alice Aprot and Tirunesh Dibaba.

Arguably the greatest track runner in history with eight major titles to her name across a decade-long timespan from 2003, Dibaba admitted she wasn’t in shape on this occasion to match Ayana after an abbreviated build-up following a spring road racing season culminating with an Ethiopian record of 2:17:56 in the London Marathon.

“If I had followed her [Ayana], I wouldn’t have won a medal. I know my capacity these days because my training for this race was very short,” said Dibaba, who only began her build-up to this race as recently as two months’ ago.

But even Dibaba at her most imperious might have struggled to stick with Ayana, who was consistently lapping at under 70-second pace per lap. Her fifth kilometre – covered in 2:49.18 – even represented world record pace for the 5000m, let alone for the 10,000m.

Aside from Dibaba and Aprot, the second group included the last two world cross country champions – Irene Cheptai and Agnes Tirop – but for all of their titles and credentials, they were losing nearly 10 seconds with each kilometre. Ayana was within sight at halfway but by the eight kilometre mark (24:30.03), the long-time leader – who covered that section in 8:38.65 – led by 36.70, representing more than half-a-lap in terms of distance on the track.

Having made a herculean mid-race effort, Ayana’s lap times were beginning to drift outside 70-second pace over the last five laps – putting Berhane Adere’s championship record of 30:04.18 just out of view – but Ayana still crossed the finish-line in 30:16.32, the second fastest winning time in championship history.

A whole gamut of stats and numbers emerged once Ayana’s scintillating performance was dissected but the most noteworthy one was her second half split of 14:24.95 – a time which would have ranked ninth in its own right on the world all-time lists.

In the race for the minor medals, Cheptai was the first of the contingent to crack – followed by Aprot – and while Dibaba might lack the pace which has taken her to so many titles over the years, Dibaba moved past Tirop at the bell and held her off on the last lap, 31:02.69 to Tirop’s 31:03.50.

After finishing fourth at the Olympics last year, Aprot just missed out on the medals again in 31:11.86 with Cheptai fading to seventh in 31:21.11, passed by the Netherlands’ Susan Krumins (31:20.24) and 2015 bronze medallist Emily Infeld (31:20.45) in the run-in to the finish.

Ayana answered any questions about her form in the most decisive manner possible but despite her barnstorming display in tonight’s 10,000m, it might be presumptuous to say that she is a shoo-in for the 5000m title.

One year ago, Ayana was a dead-cert to follow up her Olympic 10,000m title with a second gold medal but a stomach ailment left her weakened for her third race of the championships and she had to settle for bronze behind Kenyans Vivian Cheruiyot and Hellen Obiri, the latter hungry to claim her first global outdoor title.


MEN’S MARATHON – IAAF WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS LONDON 2017

Oromo athlete Tamirat Tola (silver medalist) finish 2nd to Geoffrey Kirui of Kenya.

Tola, the Olympic 10,000m bronze medallist and fastest in the field thanks to the 2:04:11 he recorded in winning this year’s Dubai Marathon, required medical treatment after struggling home in 2:09:49, just two seconds ahead of Tanzania’s Alphonce Simbu, who clocked 2:09:41.


Congratulations to All!!! The final of #iaafworldchampionships2017 in women’s 5000M: Helen Obiri of Kenya (Gold) Oromo athletes Alamaz Ayana (Silver), Sifan Hassan for  Netherlands (Bronze) & Senbere Teferi Sora is 4th.

 

Muktar Idris wins Gold in men’s 5000m and Yomifkejelcha is 4th.


The medals tally Oromo athletes (athletes of Oromia origin) win at IAAF World Championships London 2017 makes Oromia the top 6th country in the world, on the par with the host country, UK and next to China. Wthout Oromia Ethiopia just does not exist. in the spirit of Ayyaanaa and Ethics of Gadaa Oromia can stand and go alone.

The medals tally athletes of Oromia win in IAAF World Championships 2017 makes Oromia the 6th top countries in the world.

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Oromia: Athletic Nation Report: Rio Olympics: Shoeless runner Oromo athlete Etenesh Diro becomes a hero Olympian in steeplechase August 14, 2016

Posted by OromianEconomist in Africa, Athletic nation, Oromia, Oromo, Oromo Sport.
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Odaa OromooOromianEconomist

As history repeats itself, barefoot Oromo athlete Abbabaa Bqilaa (Abebe Bikila), winner of Rome Olympic Marathon in 1964.

Oromo athlete Abebe Bikila (Abbabaa Biqilaa), barefoot, won Rome Olympic in 1960.

Oromo athlete Etenesh Diro of Oromia, representing Ethiopia in Rio 2016 Olympics  competes in the Women’s 3000m Steeplechase heat.Etenesh Diro, Oromo athlete in Rio Olympics become an Olympic hero

Oromo athlete Etenesh Diro of Oromia, representing Ethiopia in Rio 2016 Olympics  competes in the Women’s 3000m Steeplechase heat.

 

Etenesh Diro, Oromo athlete in Rio Olympics become an Olympic hero p1
Oromo athlete  Etenesh Diro — one of the favourites in the women’s 3000m steeplechase — was sitting comfortably in first place about two-thirds into her heat at the Olympics when disaster struck.
Her heel was clipped by a falling opponent, sending her tumbling to the ground and removing her right shoe.

 

Etenesh Diro, Oromo athlete in Rio Olympics become an Olympic hero p2
Etenesh Diro reacts after she competed in the Women’s 3000m Steeplechase. Picture: AFP

 

The 25-year-old stood and quickly tried to put it back on her foot, but the laces were tied tight and with no time to spare she cast it aside.
Realising she’d have a better chance of running barefoot, her sock went too — and the African set about attempting to fight her way back into a race where only the first three placegetters were guaranteed of progressing to the final.

 

Etenesh Diro, Oromo athlete in Rio Olympics become an Olympic hero
Oromia’s Etenesh Diro competes in the Women’s 3000m Steeplechase.
To say the crowd at Rio’s Maracana Stadium got behind her was an understatement.
With every step of Diro’s barren hoof the energy went up a notch — and she responded by passing several runners in the final few laps to claim seventh.

After the race Diro dropped to the ground in disappointment as competitors offered their support.
She’d failed to qualify and lost the opportunity to improve on a sixth-placed finish in London. But then something heartwarming happened.
Three teams involved in the race protested.

Etenesh Diro, Oromo athlete in Rio Olympics become an Olympic hero p3

Etenesh Diro (L) is helped by officials after she competed in the Women’s 3000m Steeplechase heat. Picture: AFP

Diro had been unfairly brought down and along with Jamaica’s Aisha Praught and Ireland’s Sara Treacy — who also fell after being impeded — would be given a place in the final, which expanded to 18 runners.
She will now be the fan favourite in the final, which also features Australian Genevieve LaCaze and starts at 12.15am Tuesday AEST.


 

Oromia: Athletic Nation Report: Oromo athletes Dino Sefir and Koren Jelela win at Ottawa Marathon, IAAF Gold Label Road Race, on Sunday May 2016 May 30, 2016

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Odaa OromooOromo athletes Dino Sefir and Koren Jelela Yal beat the heat and they beat the fields to win Scotiabank Ottawa Marathon titles, Sunday, May 29, 2016.

 

Oromo athletes Dino Sefir and Koren Jelela Yal beat the heat and they beat the fields to win Scotiabank Ottawa Marathon titles, Sunday, May 29, 2016.  They drifted  to the men’s and women’s titles and their respective first-place bonuses of US $30,000.

 

Under warm and humid conditions Dino Sefir ran away from what had been considered a very tightly competitive group to win in 2:08:14. The 2012 Olympian outlasted pacers who reached only 25km before dropping out, as well as his countryman, a 19-year-old Tola Shura Kitata, to earn himself the victor’s laurels. Kitata, who burst onto the scene a year ago after running 2:08:53 in his marathon debut in Shanghai, was second in 2:10:04 with Kenya’s Dominic Ondoro third in 2:11:39.

Following Jelela to the end of the official 42.195-kilometre course were 2015 champion Aberu Makeria (2:29:51) and two other Oromo athletes, Sechale Delasa (2:32:46) and Makida Abdela Hordofa (2:34:29).


More at:

http://www.ottawasun.com/2016/05/29/ottawa-marathon-winners-ethiopias-dino-sefir-and-koren-jelela


 

Oromia: Athletic Nation: Great Manchester Run: Oromo athletes Kenenisa Bekele & Tirunesh Dibaba win May 22, 2016

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Oromo legends Tirunesh Dibaba and Kenenisa Bekele win the Great Manchster race


Three-time Olympic champion Kenenisa Bekele won the men’s race at the Great Manchester Run, finishing the 10km course in a time of 28 minutes and eight seconds.

Tirunesh Dibaba made a winning return to competition after a two year hiatus and she also created a small piece of history by becoming the first woman to claim three victories in the Great Manchester Run, an IAAF Gold Label Road Race, on Sunday 22 May 2015.

Keen to blow away the cobwebs in her first race back, Dibaba unusually took up the lead just before the two kilometre mark – a position which she barely yielded for the remainder of her comeback race.

Edna Kiplagat and early leader Diane Nukuri followed in Dibaba’s slipstream through 5km in 15:45 but Nukuri – the multiple national record-holder for Burundi on the track and road – began to lose ground after Dibaba inserted a 3:04 split for the sixth kilometre.

The order remained the same through the eight kilometre mark in 25:03 and for a short while, an upset appeared to be on the cards. Kiplagat moved into the lead for the first time while Dibaba was looking laboured.

But Dibaba stayed in contact before striking the front with about 600 metres remaining. It might not have been a vintage showing but the world 5000m record-holder proved she is likely to be a force this summer on the basis of her victory this morning in 31:16 to move to third on the 2016 world lists.

“I felt a bit nervous [before the race] but I’m happy with my result,” said Dibaba, who clocked 15:31 for the second half. “I did not expect this time; I just wanted to win. I didn’t know what was going to happen and I had no clue about the time.”

Dibaba will turn her focus back to the track with the foremost goal of sealing the qualifying time over 10,000m for the Olympic Games.

“I don’t know exactly where or when I will be running but I expect to run it within a month,” said Dibaba, who hasn’t decided if she will run any shorter races to sharpen up.

While there was a considerable degree of uncertainty in regards to the selection criteria for the Ethiopian marathon team, Dibaba more or less knows what she has to do to gain a place on her fourth Olympic team this summer.

“The federation is going to select the team according to time. The best three times will be selected,” she said.

Kiplagat, 36, finished just outside her long-standing lifetime best of 31:19 in second with 31:25 while Nukuri – who is targeting a top-15 finish in the Olympic marathon this summer – shaved three seconds off her lifetime best in third in 31:49.

On her comeback from a chest infection and virus, Gemma Steel was the top British finisher in eighth in 32:43.

Bekele defeats Kipsang for his second win in Manchester

The men’s race played out in an almost identical manner to the 2014 edition with Kenenisa Bekele cutting loose from Wilson Kipsang in the last kilometre to claim his second victory on Deansgate.

Running less than a month after contrasting fortunes in the London Marathon, Bekele and Kipsang didn’t appear to have the residual effects of that race in their legs as they eased through the halfway mark in 14:17 alongside Australia’s David McNeill and New Zealand’s Zane Robertson.

After a relatively sedate first half, the pace began to increase with Kipsang taking the initiative and by the 8km mark which was reached in 22:40, the pre-race favourites had forged nearly eighty metres on Robertson.

Given Bekele’s awesome pedigree at this distance, the outcome was more or less a foregone conclusion with two kilometres remaining and so it played out with Bekele easing away in the last kilometre.

Bekele said before the race he wasn’t expecting a fast time so soon after finishing third in the London Marathon but the two-time Olympic 10,000m champion, who took a short break after finishing third in the London contest, still broke the tape in 28:08 –after a 13:52 second half– which was faster than his winning time two years ago.

But his chance of winning a fourth Olympic title later this summer appears to be in the balance with the news that he was only named as a reserve on the Ethiopian marathon team.

Kipsang finished second for the third time in four years in 28:15 while McNeill overhauled Robertson for third, 28:39 to 28:54.

Kipsang also missed out on selection for the Olympic Games, although his chances were thwarted after he took a heavy fall at a drinks station around the 10km mark. He said his leg – which became painful after the 25km checkpoint in London – feels fine now, although he still feels some pain in his shoulder.

And had he not fallen, Kipsang is confident he would have kept pace with Eliud Kipchoge and Stanley Biwott in London, who ran 2:03:05 and 2:03:51 respectively.

“Yes, yes, definitely,” he said without hesitation. “I was prepared.”

More at:-

http://www.iaaf.org/news/report/dibaba-wins-third-manchester-10k

Injifannoo atleetota Oromoo: Oromo Athletes sweep men’s and women’s titles at Boston Marathon with the win for Lemi Berhanu Hayle and Atsede Baysa April 18, 2016

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OROMO ATHLETES DOUBLE AT BOSTON MARATHON WITH WINS FOR HAYLE AND BAYSA. 18 APRIL 2016

 

Oromo athletes Lemi Bernanu Hayle and Atsede Baysa won at the 2016 edition of the Boston Marathon, the 120th running of the IAAF Gold Label Road Race, crossing the line in 2:12:44 and 2:29:19 respectively on Monday (18).

It was the first time in the Boston Marathon race’s 120-year history that Oromo athletes representing Ethiopia  had swept both the titles.

 

OROMO ATHLETES DOUBLE AT BOSTON MARATHON WITH WINS FOR HAYLE AND BAYSA. 18 APRIL 2016. p2

Atsede Baysa rallied after falling more than 30 seconds off the pace, overcoming the deficit with a strong push through the final four miles to win the women’s Boston Marathon on Monday.

OROMO ATHLETES DOUBLE AT BOSTON MARATHON WITH WINS FOR HAYLE AND BAYSA. 18 APRIL 2016. p3

Lemi Berhanu Hayle won the men’s race after breaking away from defending champion Oromo athlete Lelisa Desisa. Hayle won in 2 hours, 12 minutes and 45 seconds.

The men’s race stumbled through halfway in 1:06:43, looking for someone willing to take command into a slight headwind and with temperatures rising to around 20 degrees Celsius.

After a few small breakaways came to nothing, defending champion Lelisa Desisa, hoping to add a third Boston win to his pair from 2013 and 2015, took charge as the course descended from Wellesley Hills to Newton Lower Falls.

Desisa moved to the front as the pack rolled down the hill and then maintained the pace as they crossed the Charles River and started up the opposite bank in the first of the Newton Hills; he slowed slightly but the rest of the pack slowed more, and abruptly a race which had looked more like a dreary committee meeting became notably more interesting.

Only Hayle stuck with Desisa’s big push, and from that point the race was primarily an Oromo duel for supremacy.

Initially Desisa let Hayle set the pace and hovered behind him waiting to move but he then came to the front and began actively trying to shake the younger runner.

Hayle, at 21 already a winner in Dubai in 2015 and runner-up there this January, also had previous wins in Warsaw and Zurich.

He was confident in his ability to win and his speed – with a best 2:04:33, he was third-fastest among the starters – but had never before a race as big as Boston.

Ultimately Hayle took over at the very end, side-by-side with Lelisa through 40km but then taking charge before the mile to go mark in Kenmore Square and opening a gap of 47 seconds back to the tiring Desisa, who held on for second in 2:13:32.

With the racing beginning a few miles after halfway, the second half was slightly faster than the first, 1:06:01 to 1:06:43 for the first half.

Yemane Tsegay won a close-fought duel with 2012 Boston winner Wesley Korir to make it a 1-2-3 finish for Ethiopia; he ran 2:14:02 to the Kenyan’s 2:14:05.

Baysa, 29 and a two-time Chicago Marathon winner came from 37 seconds at the 22-mile mark to overtake the two women in front of her.

She passed fellow Oromo athlete and sometime training partner Tirfi Tsegaye with two miles left, the latter finishing second in 2:30:03.

Kenya’s Joyce Chepkirui, who was disputing the lead with Tsegaye at 22 miles before Baysa started her long charge for glory, was third in 2:30:50 while fellow Kenyan, defending champion Caroline Rotich, dropped out barely five miles into the race.

The women’s race also started slowly, and it ultimately fell to Kenya’s Joyce Chepkirui to take charge of the pace, although as usual the lead changed frequently in the early miles while efending champion Caroline Rotich stepped off the course at 7km and ultimately dropped out.

Halfway was reached in a pedestrian 1:15:25 and the leaders were close enough that Latvia’s star Jelena Prokopcuka tangled with Oromo athlete Fatuma Sado and knocked the latter’s right shoe loose.

Sado stopped and retrieved the shoe, she and Prokopcuka then worked together to regain contact with the pack. Prokopcuka ultimately finished fourth with Sado 16th.

Much like the men, the women rolled down into Newton Lower Falls at a decent clip but slowed when they met the first hills.

Unlike the men, the pack which rode that roller coaster had thinned to four, featuring  Tirfi Tsegaye and the Kenyan trio of Chepkirui, Valentine Kipketer and Flomena Daniel; with Baysa well off the back.

After Tsegaye and Chepkirui shook the other pair off, it looked like the women’s race was coming down to a head-to-head duel as well, but Baysa had other ideas; she found a second life after cresting the Newton hills at mile 21.

With Tsegaye frequently twisting around to try and gauge the progress of her sometime training partner, Baysa closed a deficit which had grown to 37 seconds at 22 miles, when she moved into third place.

Tsegaye first tried to drop Chepkirui, but Baysa passed first the Kenyan and then her compatriot.

At 40km, Baysa started pulling clear, and she built a lead of 44 seconds, with Tsegaye second in 2:30:03.

Unlike Hayle, Baysa has a lengthy marathoning resume including victories in Chicago in 2010 and 2012, as well as wins in Saitama, Paris (twice), Xiamen, and Istanbul.

Like the men’s race, the women’s winner was faster in the second half. Baysa passed halfway in 1:15:32 and ran the hilly second half of the race in 1:13:47.

Both Kenya and Ethiopia have indicated that Boston results, along with next weekend’s race in London, will figure in selection for their Olympic team.

However, the defending Olympic champion Tiki Gelana was never a factor in the race, finishing 14th in 2:42:38 and Buzunesh Deba, a frequent contender both here and in New York and the only woman in the field to have run under 2:20:00 in Boston, was seventh in 2:33:56.

The 120th running of the Boston Marathon saw 27,491 starters set out on the classic course from the western suburb of Hopkinton to the finish line in Boston.

 

 

 

 

Read more at:-

http://www.usatoday.com/story/sports/olympics/2016/04/18/boston-marathon-womens-mens-winners/83184104/