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The Independent News: Ethiopian state TV censors #Rio2016 Olympic marathon runner’s finishing line #OromoProtests August 22, 2016

Posted by OromianEconomist in #OromoProtests, Athletic nation, Fayyisaa Lalisaa.
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Ethiopia’s state-owned TV network has refused to broadcast footage of one of its most successful Olympic athletes crossing the finishing line or receiving his medal after he staged a political protest against oppression back home.

Feyisa Lilesa won silver in the men’s marathon on the last day of events in Rio, making him Ethiopia’s joint second most successful performer after the country won just one gold in a disappointing campaign.

As he crossed the line on Sunday he raised his arms to form an “X”, a symbol of defiance that has been used by the Oromo people in Ethiopia as part of political protests against the government.

Lilesa repeated the act in a press conference after the race, and said he would repeat it at the medal ceremony later. He told reporters he faced being killed for doing so if he returns home after the Games.

EBC, the Ethiopian state broadcaster, was showing Lila’s race live on TV on Sunday afternoon. As such, it was unable to avoid airing his protest as it happened the first time.

But the moment he crossed the line was cut from subsequent bulletins and, unlike with its other champions, EBC refused entirely to show footage of Lilesa being given his silver medal.

Shown Live on TV “-n marathoner Fayisa shows protest gesture after winning Silver at http://debirhan.com/?p=10275 

Photo published for Ethiopian marathoner Fayisa shows gesture after winning Silver at #Rio2016

Ethiopian marathoner Fayisa shows gesture after winning Silver at #Rio2016

On its website, EBC carried a report on the result entitled “Ethiopia wins Silver medal in men’s marathon”.

While its online reports from other Rio events tended to show pictures of victorious athletes after they had finished competing, the Lilesa article was accompanied by an image of a group of the marathon runners halfway through the race.

Neither online nor on TV did the state-run broadcaster make direct reference to Lilesa’s protest.

The athlete is from Oromia, home to many of the 35 million Oroma people, Ethiopia’s largest ethnic group. At the press conference, he said: “The Ethiopian government is killing my people, so I stand with all protests anywhere, as Oromo is my tribe. My relatives are in prison and if they talk about democratic rights they are killed.”

Lilesa told reporters he would be killed or put in prison if he returned home, and said he feared for his wife and two children who are still in Ethiopia. He said he plans to try and stay in Brazil or make his way to the US.


Klick here to read more at Independent

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Oromia: Athletic Nation Reports: Crowdfunding campaign for #OromoProtests world icon, Rio 2016 Olympian, Fayyisaa Lalisaa has been exceeding the target. Dirmannan Goota Oromoo Fayyisaa Lalisaaf ta’aa jiru hamma abdatamee oli ta’aa jira. August 22, 2016

Posted by OromianEconomist in #OromoProtests, Athletic nation, Fayyisaa Lalisaa.
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Odaa OromooOromianEconomist

Feyisa Lelisa Support Fund, #OromoProtests iconHero Hero, double hero in Olympic Marathon, Rio 2016 and Oromummaa. Oromo athlete. Fayyisaa Lelisa. p1

Hero Hero, double hero in Olympic Marathon, Rio 2016 and Oromummaa. Oromo athlete. Fayyisaa Lelisa as he speaking to media plHero Hero, double hero in Olympic Marathon, Rio 2016 and Oromummaa. Oromo athlete. Fayyisaa Lelisaa.

Feyisa Lelisa, Oromo Olympic Marathon silver medalist and #OromoProtests global icon and Eliud Kipchoge of Kenya, Rio 2016 Olympic Marathon Gold medallist.

Feyisa Lelisa, Oromo Olympic Marathon silver medalist and #OromoProtests global icon and Eliud Kipchoge of Kenya, Rio 2016 Olympic Marathon Gold medallist

 

Dhábasá W. Gemelal‪#‎OromoProtests‬-Mother and son stand together at different places but for common goal!! Oromia shall be free!! Freedom for all!!

Deessuu garaa qamadii, haadha gootaa.

Oromo Olympic marathon athlete Fayyisaa Lalisaa in the social and international media. #OrompProtests global icon. p5

 

Oromo Olympic marathon athlete Fayyisaa Lalisaa in the social and international media. #OrompProtests global iconOromo Olympic marathon athlete Fayyisaa Lalisaa in the social and international media. #OrompProtests global icon. plOromo Olympic marathon athlete Fayyisaa Lalisaa in the social and international media. #OrompProtests global icon. p2Oromo Olympic marathon athlete Fayyisaa Lalisaa in the social and international media. #OrompProtests global icon. p3Oromo Olympic marathon athlete Fayyisaa Lalisaa in the social and international media. #OrompProtests global icon. p4Oromo Olympic marathon athlete Fayyisaa Lalisaa in the social and international media. #OrompProtests global icon. p6

Los Angeles Times@latimes 

 

Olympic Medalist Feyisa Lilesa Fears for His Life on Return to Ethiopia
The marathon runner made a symbolic protest against the government crackdown in Ethiopia

 

 

Olympic marathon runner Feyisa Lilesa ‘could be killed’ after protest against Ethiopian government

 

At the Olympic marathon finish line in Rio on Sunday, Feyisa Lilesa from Ethiopia staged a protest that he says could get him arrested or killed 


Ummati Oromoo bakka jiranitti gootummaa Fayyisaa Leellisaa sadarkaa addunyaatti dalage akka haaromsan ABOn dhaame.

ABOn tarkaanfii boonsaa Gootichi ilma Oromoo atileet Fayyisaa Leellisaa kaleessa Hagayya 21 2016 maaraatoonii olompikii Riotti gaggeeffame
irratti fudhate ilaalchisee ibsa baaseen “Fayyisaa Leellisaa: Ilma Ummatni Oromoo Itti Boonuu Qabu,” jedhe.

Itti dabaluunis, seenaa qabsoo Oromoo keessatti injifannoo olaanaa galmeessame kana dinqisiifatee, ummati Oromoo, keessayyuu atileetoti Oromoo marti qabsoo Oromootti xumura gochuuf bakka jiranitti tarkaanfii boonsaa walfakkaataa akka fudhatan waamicha godheera.

Kana malees, sabboonticha ilma Oromoo kana lammiileen Oromoo hiree itti qaban hundi isa cinaa hiriiruun gargaarsa barbaachisu hundaan akka bira dhaabbatan waamicha isaa dabarseera.  Guutuu isaa kan fulduree kana tuqa dubbisaa: ilma-ummatni-oromoo-itti-boonuu-qabu


Oromo athlete, Fayyisaa Lalisaa (Feyisa Lelisa), who finished 2nd and took Silver in  Rio 2016 Olympic in men’s Marathon, crossed the finishing line with his hands crossed, an iconic  sign of Oromo social resistance  (#OromoProtests) to injustices and tyranny in Ethiopia.  Rio Olympic Marathon was held on 21 August 2016 and its the final day of the Olympic Games.  Fayyee has made  an Olympic history on Olympic history.  made solidarity to  #OromoProtests in the podium and at medal and after press conference.

The Significance and importance of his  heroic solidarity is very understandable for those have  followed the #OromoProtests the last 2 years.

That is sign now widely recognized all over  Ethiopia as a symbol of civil resistance.  Ethiopia has been  gripped by successive anti-government protests which the recent one began in Nov. 2015 in Gincii  (Ginchi) town, Oromia state. 


BBC Africa Live ( 22 August 2016)  has reported the following:

Lilesa crossed his arms above – a gesture made by the Oromo people who have suffered brutal police crackdowns – as he finished the race. 

He now fears for his life and says he might be forced to move to another country. 

Organisers say that the fundraising drive had initially targeted $10,000 (£7,628) but it had been exceeded within an hour. 

They say they have since revised the target to $40,000 and have so far raised 33,000. 

The gesture has been made by the Oromo people

Lilesa is from Oromia, home to most of Ethiopia’s 35 million Oromo people.

He repeated the protest gesture later at a press conference.

 

 

Feyisa Lelisa Support Fund, #OromoProtests icon

 Click here to the link:

Feyisa Lelisa Support Fund

We are calling on all Ethiopians and human rights advocates to make contributions to funds needed to support Marathon athlete Feyisa Lelisa who exhibited extra-odrinary heroism by becoming an international symbol for #OromoProtests and Ethiopian Freedom Movement after winning a medal at the Rio de Janeiro
Olympic games today August 21, 2016.

Feyisa Lelisa faces persecution if he goes back to Ethiopia and he has decided to to seek assylum.  Funds are needed to support him and his family in the meantime,  Please donate whatever amount you can.  We assure you all the money collected will go to support this Oromo/Ethiopian hero.

Co-sponsered by Abdi Fite, Lalisaa Hikaa and Solomon Ungashe


 

 

Utuubaa sibilaa
Fayyee sanyi dhiiraa
Goota lammiin leellisuu
Akkuma Fayyee Garasuu
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lQQwKHtw8YY&feature=youtu.be

 

Guest Column: Ethiopia: Protests in Oromia, Amhara Regions Present ‘Critical Challenge’ – U.S. August 22, 2016

Posted by OromianEconomist in #OromoProtests, Africa, America, Human Rights, Oromia.
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Odaa OromooOromianEconomist

 

department of state

Ethiopia: Protests in Oromia, Amhara Regions Present ‘Critical Challenge’ – U.S.


By Tom Malinowski, Guest Column, 21 August 2016


The Obama administration’s top official promoting democracy and human rights,Tom Malinowski, says the Ethiopian government’s tactics in response to protests in the Oromia and Amhara regions of the country are “self-defeating”.  Writing ahead of the arrival of U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry in Nairobi for talks on East African issues, including security, Malinowski says Addis Ababa’s “next great national task is to master the challenge of political openness.”

The United States and Ethiopia have years of strong partnership, based on a recognition that we need each other. Ethiopia is a major contributor to peace and security in Africa, the U.S.’s ally in the fight against violent extremists, and has shown incredible generosity to those escaping violence and repression, admitting more refugees than any country in the world. The United States has meanwhile been the main contributor to Ethiopia’s impressive fight to end poverty, to protect its environment and to develop its economy.

Because of the friendship and common interests our two nations share, the U.S. has a stake in Ethiopia’s prosperity, stability and success. When Ethiopia does well, it is able to inspire and help others. On the other hand, a protracted crisis in Ethiopia would undermine the goals that both nations are trying to achieve together.

The recent protests in the Oromia and Amhara regions present a critical challenge. They appear to be a manifestation of Ethiopian citizens’ expectation of more responsive governance and political pluralism, as laid out in their constitution.

Almost every Ethiopian I have met during my three recent trips to the country, including government officials, has told me that as Ethiopians become more prosperous and educated, they demand a greater political voice, and that such demands must be met. While a few of the protests may have been used as a vehicle for violence, we are convinced that the vast majority of participants were exercising their right under Ethiopia’s constitution to express their views.

Any counsel that the United States might offer is intended to help find solutions, and is given with humility. As President Barack Obama said during his July, 2015 visit to Addis Ababa, the U.S. is not perfect, and we have learned hard lessons from our own experiences in addressing popular grievances.

We also know Ethiopia faces real external threats. Ethiopia has bravely confronted Al-Shabaab, a ruthless terrorist group based on its border. Individuals and groups outside Ethiopia, often backed by countries that have no respect for human rights themselves, sometimes recklessly call for violent change.

  Ethiopia rightly condemns such rhetoric, and the United States joins that condemnation. But Ethiopia has made far too much progress to be undone by the jabs of scattered antagonists who have little support among the Ethiopian people. And it is from within that Ethiopia faces the greatest challenges to its stability and unity. When thousands of people, in dozens of locations, in multiple regions come out on the streets to ask for a bigger say in the decisions that affect their lives, this cannot be dismissed as the handiwork of external enemies.

Ethiopian officials have acknowledged that protestors have genuine grievances that deserve sincere answers. They are working to address issues such as corruption and a lack of job opportunities. Yet security forces have continued to use excessive force to prevent Ethiopians from congregating peacefully, killing and injuring many people and arresting thousands. We believe thousands of Ethiopians remain in detention for alleged involvement in the protests – in most cases without having been brought before a court, provided access to legal counsel, or formally charged with a crime.

These are self-defeating tactics. Arresting opposition leaders and restricting civil society will not stop people from protesting, but it can create leaderless movements that leave no one with whom the government can mediate a peaceful way forward. Shutting down the Internet will not silence opposition, but it will scare away foreign investors and tourists. Using force may temporarily deter some protesters, but it will exacerbate their anger and make them more uncompromising when they inevitably return to the streets.

Every government has a duty to protect its citizens; but every legitimate and successful government also listens to its citizens, admits mistakes, and offers redress to those it has unjustly harmed. Responding openly and peacefully to criticism shows confidence and wisdom, not weakness. Ethiopia would also be stronger if it had more independent voices in government, parliament and society, and if civil society organizations could legally channel popular grievances and propose policy solutions. Those who are critical of the government would then have to share responsibility, and accountability, for finding those solutions. Progress in reforming the system would moderate demands to reject it altogether.

Ethiopia’s next great national task is to master the challenge of political openness, just as it has been mastering the challenge of economic development. Given how far Ethiopia has traveled since the days of terror and famine, the United States is confident that its people can meet this challenge – not to satisfy any foreign country, but to fulfill their own aspirations. The U.S. and all of Ethiopia’s friends are ready to help.

Tom Malinowski is the U.S. Assistant Secretary of State for Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor.