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Scientific Research: Iodine deficiency and women’s health: Colonialism’s malign effect on health in #Oromia May 18, 2015

Posted by OromianEconomist in Africa, Micronutrient deficiency in Oromia.
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Iodine deficiency and women’s health: Colonialism’s malign effect on health in Oromia region, in Ethiopia

http://www.scirp.org/Journal/PaperInformation.aspx?PaperID=31970#.VVo8N7lVikp

 

Author(s),  Begna Dugassa

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Iodine is an essential nutrient needed for the synthesis of hormone thyroxin. Hormone thyroxin is involved in the metabolism of several nutrients, the regulation of enzymes and differentiation of cells, tissues and organs. Iodine deficiency (ID) impairs the development of the brain and nervous system. It affects cognitive capacity, educability, productivity and child mortality. ID hinders physical strength and causes reproductive failure. The objective of this paper is to explore if the health impacts of ID are more common and severe among women. Design: Using primary data (notes from a visit) and secondary data, this paper examines if the effects of ID are more common and severe among Oromo women inEthiopia. Findings: The health impacts of ID are more common and severe among women. Conclusions: ID is an easily preventable nutritional problem. In Oromia, the persistence of ID is explained by the Ethiopian government’s colonial social policies. Preventing ID should be seen as part of the efforts we make to enhance capacity building, promote health, gender equity and social justice. Implications: Iodine deficiency has a wide range of biological, social, economic and cultural impacts. Preventing ID can be instrumental in bringing about gender equity and building the capacity of people.

Cite this paper

Dugassa, B. (2013) Iodine deficiency and women’s health: Colonialism’s malign effect on health in Oromia region, in Ethiopia. Health, 5, 958-972. doi: 10.4236/health.2013.55127.

References

[1] Dugassa, B. and Negassa, A. (2012) Understanding the ecology of iodine deficiency and its public health implications: The case of oromia region in Ethiopia. Journal of Community Nutrition & Health, 1, 4-17.
[2] UNICEF (2008) Sustainable elimination of iodine deficiency, progress since the 1990. World Summit for Children. http://www.childinfo.org/files/idd_sustainable_elimination.pdf
[3] Iodine Network (2012) Country profiles Ethiopia. http://iodinenetwork.net/countries/Ethiopia.htm#6
[4] WHO (2007) Iodine deficiency in Europe: A continuing public health problem. In: Anderson, M., De Benoist, B., Darnton-Hill, I. and Delange, F., Eds., France. http://whqlibdoc.who.int/publications/2007/9789241593960_eng.pdf
[5] WHO (2010) Ethiopia: Health profile. http://www.who.int/gho/countries/eth.pdf
[6] WHO (2010) Kenya: Health profile. http://www.who.int/gho/countries/ken.pdf
[7] Stewart, G., Carter, J., Parker, A. and Alloway, B. (2003) The illusion of environmental iodine deficiency. Environmental Geochemistry and Health, 25, 165-170. doi:10.1023/A:1021281822514
[8] Meletis, C. and Zabriskie, N. (2007) Iodine, a critically overlooked nutrient. Alternative & Complementary Therapies, 13, 132-136. doi:10.1089/act.2007.13309
[9] Hetzel, B. and Mano, A. (1989) A review of experimental studies of iodine deficiency during fetal development. Journal of Nutrition, 119, 145-151.
[10] Ingenbleek, Y. and Jung, L.B. (1999) A new iodized oil for eradicating endemic goiter. In: Abdulla, M., Bost, M., Gamon, S., Arnaud, P. and Chazot, G., Eds., New Aspects of Trace Element Research, Smith-Gordon, London.

 

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